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Temperature-Sensitive DNA Polymerase from Rous Sarcoma Virus Mutants

  • David Baltimore
  • Inder M. Verma
  • Stanley Drost
  • William S. Mason
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 5)

Abstract

The DNA polymerase which can be isolated from the virions of RNA tumor viruses (the “reverse transcriptase”) has many properties which suggest that its role is to synthesize a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome (Temin and Baltimore, 1972). Only genetic experiments, however, are able to definitely establish whether it does act to copy the viral genome. Recently, Linial and Mason (1973) and Wyke (1973) have isolated and characterized temperature-sensitive mutants of Rous sarcoma virus which show temperature-sensitive synthesis of DNA in vitro. These are mutants in a function necessary only very early in the viral growth cycle. It therefore seems likely that these mutants represent temperature-sensitive DNA polymerase mutants and could be utilized to delineate the function of the DNA polymerase found in the virions of RNA tumor viruses.

Keywords

Wild Type Enzyme Mutant Enzyme Wild Type Virus Inactivation Rate Rous Sarcoma Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Baltimore
    • 1
  • Inder M. Verma
    • 1
  • Stanley Drost
    • 1
  • William S. Mason
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiologyMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA
  2. 2.The Institute for Cancer ResearchPhiladelphiaUSA

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