Strength and Stress-Strain Characteristics of Cemented Deep-Sea Sediments

  • Vito A. Nacci
  • William E. Kelly
  • Mian C. Wang
  • Kenneth R. Demars
Part of the Marine Science book series (MR, volume 2)

Abstract

It has become increasingly apparent that the engineering properties of ocean sediments differ significantly from land sediments. The suspicion is that interparticle bonding may be the major cause of the difference.

Although the nature and stability of these bonds are unknown, various tests are made to infer the brittle nature of the bonding and indicate stress-strain-pore pressure parameters.

Consolidation and shear tests, as well as standard classification tests, have been carried out on boomerang and piston deep-sea cores. Consistent results have been obtained such that the low pore pressure parameter, Af, and the high ratio of undrained shear strength to overburden pressure, c/p, are credible.

Recommendations as to sampling and laboratory testing for soft ocean sediments are made.

Keywords

Shear Strength Pore Pressure Triaxial Test Overburden Pressure Triaxial Compression Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vito A. Nacci
    • 1
  • William E. Kelly
    • 1
  • Mian C. Wang
    • 1
  • Kenneth R. Demars
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Rhode IslandUSA

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