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Standardization of Marine Geotechnics Symbols, Definitions, Units, and Test Procedures

  • Adrian F. Richards
Part of the Marine Science book series (MR, volume 2)

Abstract

The ONR Seminar-Workshop participants approved selected symbols taken from the International Society of Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering source book of symbols and definitions. A synopsis of applicable SI units in marine geotechnics is made from the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the U. S. National Bureau of Standards guides; relevant conversion formulas from old metric and U. S. customary units to SI units are presented. ASTM tests and recommended test modifications applicable to marine soils are summarized. Commonly used non-ASTM-approved laboratory and field tests are listed, together with selected references to the literature describing each test. Recommendations are made for the effective use of symbols, definitions, units, and test procedures in marine geotechnics.

Keywords

Shear Strength Undrained Shear Strength American National Standard Institute Cone Penetrometer Vane Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adrian F. Richards
    • 1
  1. 1.Lehigh UniversityUSA

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