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Smooth Muscle pp 361-383 | Cite as

Nerve—Muscle Preparations of the Small Intestine

  • Mollie E. Holman

Abstract

An isolated segment of small intestine is one of the commonest test preparations used by pharmacologists. Since the integrity of the plexuses of nerve cells within the wall of the intestine is preserved under normal conditions, segments of intestine must always be considered as “nerve-muscle” preparations. The aim of this section is to review, very briefly, the innervation of the small intestine and to draw attention to the difficulties involved in analyzing the action of drugs on this complex system (see also Kosterlitz and Lees, 1964; Daniel, 1968). A useful source of background material can be found in theHandbook of Physiology published by the American Physiological Society (Code, 1968).

Keywords

Small Intestine Slow Wave Myenteric Plexus Alimentary Canal American Physiological Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mollie E. Holman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyMonash UniversityClaytonAustralia

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