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Hypoxic Cell Sensitizers for Radiotherapy

  • G. E. Adams
Part of the Cancer book series (C, volume 6)

Abstract

In the treatment of malignant disease with combinations of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, it is important to draw distinctions between adjunctive agents, so-called potentiating agents, and true radiation sensitizers (Bleehen, 1973). This is illustrated by Fig. 1. For the truly adjunctive agent, the overall effect results from the separate but additive effects of both modalities, althought there is little or no gain in overall therapeutic ratio. Potentiation arises (Fig. lb) when the combined effect of both modalities is greater than the sum of the effects of each of the separate treatments. True potentiation is, however, difficult to characterize since, depending on the criteria of measurement, the complex nature of dose-response curves can sometimes indicate apparent potentiation when, in reality, the drug and radiation treatments are giving a purely additive affect in terms of cell killing.

Keywords

Linear Energy Transfer Hypoxic Cell Enhancement Ratio Pulse Radiolysis Tumor Control Probability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. E. Adams
    • 1
  1. 1.Gray Laboratory, Cancer Research CampaignMount Vernon HospitalNorthwood, MiddlesexEngland

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