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Neoplasia in Poikilotherms

  • Dante G. Scarpelli
Part of the Cancer book series (C, volume 4)

Abstract

A detailed knowledge of the incidence, distribution, and natural history of neoplasia throughout the animal kingdom is of central importance in gaining an understanding of cancer as a biological process. Examples of abnormal growth have been encountered in many taxonomic groups of animals and at every level of biological complexity. However, except for the mammals, the study of neoplasia, especially in the lower vertebrates, is to a large extent descriptive, haphazard, and incomplete. In this chapter, we will deal with some aspects of the biology of neoplasia in poikilotherms. As we shall see, this task becomes increasingly difficult as we approach the more primitive vertebrates and invertebrates because there are significant gaps in our knowledge of their biology and patterns of response to injury. Further, in more primitive forms of life, the precise classification of disturbances of tissue growth as neoplastic becomes increasingly difficult because of the vast structural and functional differences that separate these organisms from the more familiar and well-studied higher poikilotherms. This state of affairs has become particularly frustrating in recent years in view of the rapid advances in cell biology which emphasize the unity of basic organization and function throughout biological systems and the striking similarities of such. In this regard, it is worth recalling that many aspects of the inflammatory reaction observed in the water flea (Daphnia), as well as the sequential reactions of protein synthesis elucidated from biochemical studies of Escherichia coli, are directly applicable to these phenomena in higher animals, including the mammals, since they appear to have been copied with great fidelity throughout the evolutionary development of life.

Keywords

Rainbow Trout Related Disorder Chemical Carcinogen Northern Pike Lower Vertebrate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dante G. Scarpelli
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathology and OncologyUniversity of Kansas Medical Center, College of Health Sciences and HospitalKansas CityUSA

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