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DNA Viruses: Molecular Biology

  • F. Rapp
  • M. A. Jerkofsky
Part of the Cancer book series (C, volume 2)

Abstract

There is no longer any doubt that viruses are associated with a number of malignant states both under natural conditions in animal populations and after certain defined experimental manipulations in the laboratory. However, there still remains some question as to whether viruses play the principal role in the etiology of the majority of malignant conditions, especially those of human origin. At the present time, work continues in many laboratories in the attempt to find the definitive answer to this question.

Keywords

Deoxyribonucleic Acid Simian Virus Adenovirus Type Polyoma Virus Baby Hamster Kidney Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Rapp
    • 1
  • M. A. Jerkofsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology College of MedicineThe Milton S. Hershey Medical Center of The Pennsylvania State UniversityHersheyUSA

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