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Mammary Tumor Virus

  • Dan H. Moore
Part of the Cancer book series (C, volume 2)

Abstract

Two hundred years ago, Bernard Peyrilhe of Perpignan, France, believing that cancer might be caused by “a specific virus,”* injected subcutaneously, into a dog, fluid from a human breast carcinoma. This was 25 years before Edward Jenner inoculated an 8-year-old boy with “matter from cow-pox vesicles” which successfully protected him against a later inoculation with smallpox virus. Although the experiment of Peyrilhe was itself not successful, the idea was kept alive in the minds of a few investigators until the present century, and now viruses as etiological agents in cancer are known to be commonplace.

Keywords

Mammary Gland Mammary Tumor Human Milk Tumor Incidence Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dan H. Moore
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Medical ResearchCamdenUSA

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