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Functional Properties of the Auditory System of the Brain Stem

  • J. M. Harrison

Abstract

For purposes of exposition, the ascending auditory system is herein divided into three levels: the acoustic nerve and the cochlear nucleus, the superior olivary complex, and the inferior colliculus. A fourth section deals with the descending auditory system.

Keywords

Inferior Colliculus Cochlear Nucleus Interaural Time Difference Medial Geniculate Body Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. M. Harrison
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyBoston UniversityBostonUSA
  2. 2.New England Regional Primate Research CenterHarvard Medical SchoolSouthboroughUSA

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