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Plant Covirus Systems: Two-Component Systems

  • George Bruening

Abstract

The central concept concerning the viruses described in this chapter is that they have in common the following characteristic: the minimum genetic entity which can be derived from the virus, and which can induce an infection in which virions are formed, is two pieces of RNA. The two pieces of RNA, which can be considered to be the two chromosomes composing the genome of the virus, are (for the plant viruses described here) found in distinguishable ribonucleoprotein particles. That is, the genome is distributed in two kinds of virions. The notion of the extracellular phase of a virus life cycle being represented by “virions” rather than “virion” is generally alien to bacterial, animal, and fungal virology. However, probably nearly half of the recognized groups of plant viruses have virions rather than a virion. What advantage does such an arrangement give a plant virus? Why do such viruses find a niche which apparently has not been occupied by a monochromosomal, monovirion virus? A priori, the potential disadvantage of having to bring at least two particles or RNA molecules into a cell, rather than one, is most obvious.

Keywords

Sedimentation Coefficient Ringspot Virus Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus Sucrose Density Gradient Centrifugation Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Bruening
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and BiophysicsUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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