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Genetics of Reoviruses

  • Rise K. Cross
  • Bernard N. Fields
Part of the Comprehensive Virology book series (CV, volume 9)

Abstract

One of the most striking features of the reoviruses is the unusual nature of their genetic material. The genome of reovirus consists of ten unique segments of double-stranded (ds) RNA which are packaged within a double-shelled capsid composed of protein subunits (Bellamy et al., 1967; Shatkin et al., 1968; Watanabe et al., 1968) (Fig. 1). Each of these dsRNA fragments falls into one of three size classes: there are three large (L), three medium (M), and four small (S) molecules with molecular weights of about 2.7, 1.4, and 0.7 × 106, respectively; the total genome equivalent molecular weight is about 15 × 106. Although the exact topology of the ten segments within the double-shelled capsid is unknown and even less information is available regarding the mechanism which ensures their encapsidation, several lines of evidence attest to their structural as well as functional discreteness (Joklik, 1974). The plus strand of all of the dsRNA segments has quite recently been found to contain an unusual blocked, methylated 5′-terminal structure with the sequence m7G(5′)ppp(5′)GmpCp...(Furuichi et al., 1975). Each segment of genome RNA serves as a template for the synthesis of a monocistronic messenger RNA molecule which is translated into a unique polypeptide species (McDowell et al., 1972; Both et al.,1975).

Keywords

Newcastle Disease Virus Genome Segment Group Band Nonpermissive Temperature Defective Virion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rise K. Cross
    • 1
  • Bernard N. Fields
    • 2
  1. 1.The Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology and Molecular GeneticsHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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