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Reproduction of Paramyxoviruses

  • Purnell W. Choppin
  • Richard W. Compans

Abstract

The paramyxovirus group is a large one which includes the parainfluenza viruses types 1–5, Newcastle disease, and mumps viruses. Measles, canine distemper, and rinderpest viruses form a distinct subgroup on the basis of antigenicity, hemagglutinating characteristics, and lack of evidence for a virion-associated neuraminidase or neuraminic acid-containing cellular receptors. However, it is now generally accepted that these viruses should also be included in the paramyxovirus group because of their similar structural properties. Other more recently isolated viruses which have been classified as paramyxoviruses on the basis of morphological and biological properties are Yucaipa (Dinter et al., 1964) and Nariva (Walder, 1971) viruses. Table 1 lists paramyxoviruses and their primary hosts.

Keywords

Influenza Virus Newcastle Disease Virus Cell Fusion Measle Virus Sendai Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Purnell W. Choppin
    • 1
  • Richard W. Compans
    • 1
  1. 1.The Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA

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