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Reproduction pp 475-480 | Cite as

Addendum to Chapter 2 Reproduction of Papovaviruses

  • Norman P. Salzman
  • George Khoury
Part of the Comprehensive Virology book series (CV)

Abstract

It would appear from the discussion in previous sections that the interaction between papovaviruses and their host cells is quite complex. Yet the SV40 and polyoma virus genomes are smalI, with a coding capacity for three to seven proteins. By isolating and studying the properties of conditionally lethai mutants, it was hoped that particular biological properties could be directly related to the function of specific viral proteins, and that these functions, in turn, could be mapped on the viral genome. This approach, has been particularly successful in the last three years, largely through the efforts of several investigators who have isolated and characterized large numbers of temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants.

Keywords

Restrictive Temperature Permissive Temperature Lytic Cycle Nonpermissive Temperature Polyoma Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman P. Salzman
  • George Khoury

There are no affiliations available

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