Advertisement

Reproduction pp 63-141 | Cite as

Reproduction of Papovaviruses

  • Norman P. Salzman
  • George Khoury
Part of the Comprehensive Virology book series (CV)

Abstract

The principal members of the papova group are polyoma virus (Stewart et al., 1957), simian virus 40 (SV40), which is a vacuolating virus of monkeys (Sweet and Hilleman, 1960), and the papilloma viruses (Melnick, 1962). The name for this group of viruses is derived from the first two letters of the names of each of the viruses that were first included in the group, papilloma, polyoma, vacuolating virus (Melnick, 1962). The viruses are 40–57 nm in diameter and, as determined by negative staining, the outer shell has symmetry of the T = 7 icosahedral surface lattice and is composed of 72 morphological subunits (Finch and Klug, 1965; Anderer et al., 1967). The viruses contain no lipids and therefore are resistant to ether. Polyoma and SV40 do not share common antigens, nor is there evidence for the existence of any homology between their DNAs. The papovaviruses are capable of initiating a lytic cycle of replication or a latent infection. For the papilloma viruses it is difficult to obtain a suitable cell line in which the lytic cycle can be studied and for this reason studies that we will discuss concerning viral replication will deal exclusively with SV40 and polyoma.

Keywords

Simian Virus Monkey Kidney Cell Lytic Cycle Replicative Intermediate Polyoma Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Aaronson, S. A., and Martin, M. A., 1970, Transformation of human cells with different forms of SV40 DNA, Virology 42, 848.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Aaronson, S. A., and Todaro, G. J., 1969, Human diploid cell transformation by DNA extracted from the tumor virus SV40, Science (Wash. D.C.) 166, 390.Google Scholar
  3. Acheson, N. H., Buetti, E., Scherrer, K., and Weil, R., 1971, Transcription of the polyoma virus genome: Synthesis and cleavage of giant late polyoma-specific RNA, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 68, 2231.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Aloni, Y., 1972, Extensive symmetrical transcription of simian virus 40 DNA in virus-yielding cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 2024.Google Scholar
  5. Aloni, Y., 1973, Poly A and symmetrical transcription of SV40 DNA, Nat. New Biol. 243, 2.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Aloni, Y., and Locker, H., 1973, Symmetrical in vivo transcription of polyoma DNA and the separation of self-complementary viral and cell DNA, Virology 54, 495.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Aloni, Y., Winocour, E. and Sachs, L., 1968, Characterization of the simian virus 40-specific RNA in virus-yielding and -transformed cells, J. Mol. Biol. 31, 415.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Aloni, Y., Winocour, E., Sachs, L., and Torten, J., 1969, Hybridization between SV40 DNA and cellular DNA’s, J. Mol. Biol. 44, 333.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Anderer, F. A., Schlumberger, H. D., Koch, M. A., Frank, H., and Eggers, H. J., 1967, Structure of simian virus 40. II. Symmetry and components of the virus particle, Virology 32, 511.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Anderson, C. W., and Gesteland, R. F., 1972, Pattern of protein synthesis in monkey cells infected by simian virus 40, J. Virol. 9, 758.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Arber, W. and Linn, S., 1969, DNA modification and restriction, in “Annual Review of Biochemistry,” pp. 467–500, Annual Reviews, Palo Alto, California.Google Scholar
  12. Astrin, S. M., 1973, In vitro transcription of simian virus 40 sequences in SV3T3 chromatin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 70, 2304.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Babiuk, L. A., and Hudson, J. B., 1972, Integration of polyoma virus DNA into mammalian genomes, Biochem. Biophyr. Res. Commun. 47, 111.Google Scholar
  14. Barban, S., 1973, Electrophoretic differences in the capsid proteins of simian virus 40 plaque mutants, J. Virol. 11, 971.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Barban, S., and Goor, R. S., 1971, Structural proteins of simian virus 40, J. Virol. 7, 198.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Barbanti-Brodano, G., Swetly, P., and Koprowski, H., 1970, Early events in the infection of permissive cells with simian virus 40: Adsorption, penetration, and uncoating, J. Virol. 6, 78.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Basilico, C., and DiMayorca, G., 1965, Radiation target size of the lytic and the transforming ability of polyoma virus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 54, 125.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Basilico, C., Marin, G., and DiMayorca, G., 1966, Requirement for the integrity of the viral genome for the induction of host DNA synthesis by polyoma virus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 56, 208.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Basilico, C., Matsuya, Y., and Green, M. H., 1969, Origin of the thymidine kinase induced by polyoma virus in productively infected cells, J. Virol. 3, 140.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  20. Bauer, W., and Vinograd, J., 1968, The interaction of closed circular DNA with intercalative dyes. I. The superhelix density of SV40 DNA in the presence and absence of dye, J. Mol. Biol. 33, 141.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Baum, S. G., Horwitz, M. S., and Maizel, J. V., Jr., 1972, Studies of the mechanism of enhancement of human adenovirus infection in monkey cells by simian virus 40, J. Virol. 10, 211.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. Beard, P., Morrow, J. F., and Berg, P., 1973, Cleavage of circular superhelical SV40 DNA to a linear duplex by S, nuclease, J. Virol. 12, 1303.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Beerman, T. A., and Lebowtiz, J., 1973, Further analysis of the altered secondary structure of superhelical DNA. Sensitivity of methylmercuric hydroxide a chemical probe for unpaired bases, J. Mol. Biol. 79, 451.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. Benjamin, T. L., 1965, Relative target sizes for the inactivation of the transforming and reproductive abilities of polyoma virus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 54, 121.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Benjamin, T. L., 1966, Virus-specific RNA in cells productively infected or transformed by polyoma virus, J. Mol. Biol. 16, 359.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  26. Ben-Porat, T., and Kaplan, A. S., 1967, Correlation between replication and degradation of cellular DNA in polyoma virus-infected cells, Virology 32, 457.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. Ben-Porat, T., Coto, C., and Kaplan, A. S., 1966, Unstable DNA synthesized by polyoma virus-infected cells, Virology 30, 74.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  28. Bigger, C., Murray, K., and Murray, N. E., 1973, Recognition sequence of a restriction enzyme, Nat. New Biol. 244, 7.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  29. Black, P. H., and Rowe, W. P., 1973, SV40-induced proliferation of tissue culture cells of rabbit, mouse and procine origin, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 114, 721.Google Scholar
  30. Black, P. H., Rowe, W. P., Turner, H. C., and Huebner, R. J., 1963, A specific complement-fixing antigen present in SV40 tumor and transformed cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 50, 1148.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  31. Bourgaux, P., and Bourgaux-Ramoisy, D., 1972a, Unwinding of replicating polyoma virus DNA, J. Mol. Biol. 70, 399.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  32. Bourgaux, P., and Bourgaux-Ramoisy, D., 19726, Is a specific protein responsible for the supercoiling of polyoma DNA? Nature (Lond.) 235, 105.Google Scholar
  33. Bourgaux, P., Bourgaux-Ramoisy, D., and Stoker, M., 1965, Further studies on transformation by DNA from polyoma virus, Virology 25, 364.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. Bourgaux, P., Bourgaux-Ramoisy, D., and Dulbecco, R., 1969, The replication of ring-shaped DNA of polyoma virus. I. identification of the replicative intermediate, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 64, 701.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  35. Bourguignon, M. F., 1968, A denaturation map of polyoma virus DNA, Biochina. Biophys. Acta 166, 242.Google Scholar
  36. Boyer, H. W., 1971, DNA restriction and modification mechanisms in bacteria, in “Annual Review of Microbiology,” p. 153–176, Annual Reviews, Palo Alto, Calif.Google Scholar
  37. Boyer, H. W., Chow, L. T., Dugaiczyk, A., Hedgpeth, J., and Goodman, H. M., 1973, DNA substrate site for the Eco R restriction endonuclease and modification methylase, Nat. New Biol. 244, 172.Google Scholar
  38. Branton, P. E., and Sheinin, R., 1973, Studies on the replication of polyoma DNA: Physicochemical properties of viral DNA synthesized when protein synthesis is inhibited, Can. J. Biochena., 51, 305.Google Scholar
  39. Branton, P. E., Cheevers, W. P., and Sheinin, R., 1970, The effect of cycloheximide on DNA synthesis in cells productively-infected with polyoma virus, Virology 42, 979.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  40. Britten, R. J., and Kohne, D. E., 1968, Repeated sequences in DNA, Science (Wash., D.C.) 161, 529.Google Scholar
  41. Brockman, W. W., Lee, T. N. H., and Nathans, D., 1973, The evolution of new species of viral DNA during serial passage of simian virus 40 at high multiplicity, Virology 54, 384.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  42. Burns, W. H., and Black, P. H., 1968, Analysis of simian virus 40-induced transformation of hamster kidney tissue in vitro. V. Variability of virus recovery from cell clones inducible with mitomycin C and cell fusion, J. Virol. 2, 606.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  43. Burton, A., and Sinsheimer, R. L., 1963, Process of infection with OX 174: Effect of exonucleases on the replicative form, Science (Wash., D.C.) 142, 962.Google Scholar
  44. Butel, J. S., and Rapp, F., 1965, The effect of arabinofuranosylcytosine on the growth cycle of simian virus 40, Virology 27, 490.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  45. Butel, J. S., Guentzel, M. J., and Rapp, F., 1969, Variants of defective simian papovavirus 40 (para) characterized by cytoplasmic localization of simian papovavirus 40 tumor antigen, J. Virol. 4, 632.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  46. Butel, J. S., Richardson, L. S., and Melnick, J. L., 1971, Variation in properties of SV40-transformed simian cell lines detected by superinfection with SV40 and human adenoviruses, Virology 46, 844.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  47. Cairns, J., 1963, The chromosome of Escherichia coli, Cold Spring Harbor Svmp. Quant. Biol. 28, 43.Google Scholar
  48. Carp, R. I., and Gilden, R. V., 1965, The inactivation of simian virus 40 infectivity and antigen-inducing capacity by ultraviolet light, Virology 27, 639.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  49. Carp, R. I., Sauer, G., and Sokol, F., 1969, The effect of actinomycin D on the transcription and replication of simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid, Virology 37, 214.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  50. Chamberlin, M., McGrath, J., and Waskell, L., 1970, New RNA polymerase from Escherichia coli infected with bacteriophage T7, Nature (Lond.) 228, 227.Google Scholar
  51. Champoux, J. J., and Dulbecco, R., 1972, An activity from mammalian cells that untwists superhelical DNA-A possible swivel for DNA replication. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 143.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  52. Coggin, J. H., Elrod, L. H., Ambrose, K. R., and Anderson, N. G., 1969, Induction of tumor-specific transplantation immunity in hamster with cell fractions from adenovirus and SV40 tumor cells, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 132, 328.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  53. Cowan, K., Tegtmeyer, P., and Anthony, D. D., 1973, Relationship of replication and transcription of simian virus 40 DNA, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 70, 1927.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  54. Crawford, L. V., 1962, The adsorption of polyoma virus, Virology 18, 177.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  55. Crawford, L. V., 1964, A study of shope papilloma virus DNA, J. Mol. Biol. 8, 489.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  56. Crawford, L. V., 1965, A study of human papilloma virus DNA, J. Mol. Biol. 13, 362. Crawford, L. V., and Black, P. H., 1964, The nucleic acid of simian virus 40, Virology 24, 388.Google Scholar
  57. Crawford, L. Dulbecco, R., Fried, M., Montagneir, L., and Stoker, M., 1964, Cell transformation by different forms of polyoma virus DNA, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 52, 148.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  58. Crawford, L. V., Crawford, E. M., Richardson, J. P., and Slayter, H. S., 1965, The binding of RNA polyomerase to polyoma and papilloma DNA, J. Mol. Biol. 14, 593.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  59. Crawford, L. V., Syrett, C., and Wilde, A., 1973, The replication of polyoma virus, J. Gen. Virol. 21, 515.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  60. Cuzin, F., Vogt, M., Dieckmann, M., and Berg, P., 1970, Induction of virus-multiplication in 3T3 cells transformed by a thermosensitive mutant of polyoma virus. II. Formation of oligomeric polyoma DNA molecules, J. Mol. Biol. 47, 317.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  61. Cuzin, F., Blangy, D., and Rouget, P., 1971, Activite endonucleastique de preparation purifie du virus polyome, C. R. Hebd. Seances Acad. Sci. Ser. D Sci. Nat. 273, 2650.Google Scholar
  62. Danna, K. and Nathans, D., 1971, Specific cleavage of simian virus 40 DNA by restriction endonuclease of Hemophilus influenza. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 68, 2913.Google Scholar
  63. Danna, K. J. and Nathans, D., 1972, Bidirectional replication of simian virus 40 DNA, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 3097.Google Scholar
  64. Danna, K. J., Sack, G. H., Jr., and Nathans, D., 1973, Studies of simian virus 40 DNA. VII. A cleavage map of the SV40 genome, J. Mol. Biol. 78, 363.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  65. Davis, R., Simon, M., and Davidson, N., 1971, Electron microscope heteroduplex methods for mapping regions of base sequence homology in nucleic acids, in “Methods in Enzymology” (L. Grossman and K. Moldave, eds.), pp. 413–428, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  66. Dean, W. W., and Lebowitz, J., 1971, Partial alteration of secondary structure in native superhelical DNA, Nat. New Biol. 231, 5.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  67. Defendi, V., 1963, Effect of SV40 virus immunization on growth of transplantable SV40 and polyoma virus tumors in hamsters, Proc. Soc. Biol. Med. 113, 12.Google Scholar
  68. Delius, H., Westphal, H., and Axelrod, N., 1973, Length measurements of RNA synthesized in vitro by E. coli polymerase, J. Mol. Biol. 74, 677.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  69. Del Villano, B. C., and Defendi, V., 1973, Characterization of the SV40 T antigen, Virology 51, 34.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  70. Dhar, R., Zain, S., Weissman, S. M., Pan, J., and Subramanian, K., 1973, Nucleotide sequences of RNA transcribed in infected cells and by E. Coli polymerase from a segment of simian virus 40 DNA, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 71, 371.Google Scholar
  71. Dubbs, D. R., Kit, S., deTorres, R. A., and Anken, M., 1967, Virogenic properties of bromodeoxyuridine-sensitive and bromodeoxyuridine-resistant simian virus 40-transformed mouse kidney cells, J. Virol. 1, 968.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  72. Dulbecco, R., and Vogt, M., 1963, Evidence for a ring structure of polyoma virus DNA, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 50, 236.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  73. Dulbecco, R., Hartwell, L. H., and Vogt, M., 1965, Induction of cellular DNA synthesis by polyoma virus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 53, 403.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  74. Estes, M. K., Huang, E.-S., and Pagano, J. S., 1971, Structural polypeptides of simian virus 40, J. Virol. 7, 635.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  75. Fareeçl, G. C., and Salzman, N. P., 1972, Intermediate in SV40 DNA chain growth, Nat. New Biol. 238, 274.Google Scholar
  76. Fareed, G. C., Garon, C. F., and Salzman, N. P., 1972, Origin and direction of simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid replication, J. Virol. 10, 484.Google Scholar
  77. Fareed, G. C., Khoury, G., and Salzman, N. P., 1973a, Self-annealing of 4 S strands from replicating simian virus 40 DNA, J. Mol. Biol. 77, 457.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  78. Fareed, G. C., McKerlie, M. L., and Salzman, N. P., 1973b, Characterization of simian virus 40 DNA component II during viral DNA replication, J. Mol. Biol. 74, 95.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  79. Fareed, G. C., Byrne, J. C., and Martin, M. A., 1974, Triplication of a unique genetic segment in an SV40-like virus of human origin and evolution of new viral genomes, J. Mol. Biol. 86, in press.Google Scholar
  80. Fiers, W., and Sinsheimer, R. L., 1962, The structure of the DNA of bacteriophage 0X174, J. Mol. Biol. 5, 408.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  81. Finch, J. T., and Klug, A., 1965, The structures of viruses of the papilloma-polyoma type. III. Structure of rabbit papilloma virus, J. Mol. Biol. 13, 1.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  82. Fine, R., Mass, M., and Murakami, W. T., 1968, Protein composition of polyoma virus, J. Mol. Biol. 36, 167.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  83. Fischer, H., and Sauer, G., 1972, Identification of virus-induced proteins in cells productively infected with simian virus 40, J. Virol. 9, 1.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  84. Follett, E. A. C., and Crawford, L. V., 1968, Electron microscope study of the denaturation of polyoma virus DNA, J. Mol. Biol. 34, 565.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  85. Fox, R. I., and Baum, S. G., 1972, Synthesis of viral ribonucleic acid during restricted adenovirus infection, J. Virol. 10, 220.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  86. Frearson, D. M., and Crawford, L. V., 1972, Polyoma virus basic proteins, J. Gen. Virol. 14, 141.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  87. Fried, A. H., and Sokol, F., 1972, Synthesis in vitro by bacterial RNA polymerise of simian virus 40-specific RNA: Multiple transcription of the DNA template into a continuous polyribonucleotide, J. Gen. Virol. 17, 69.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  88. Fried, M., 1970, Characterization of a temperature-sensitive mutant of polyoma virus, Virology 40, 605.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  89. Friedman, M. P., Lyons, M. J., and Ginsberg, H. S., 1970, Biochemical consequences of type 2 adenovirus and simian virus 40 double infections of African green monkey kidney cells, J. Virol. 5, 586.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  90. Friedmann, T., 1974, Novel genetic economy of polyoma virus: Capsid proteins are cleavage products of same viral gene, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 71, 257.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  91. Friedmann, T., and David, D., 1972, Structural roles of polyoma virus proteins, J. Virol. 10, 776.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  92. Gerber, P., 1966, Studies on the transfer of subviral infectivity from SV40-induced hamster tumor cells to indicator cells, Virology 28, 501.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  93. Gilbert, W. and Dressler, D., 1968, DNA replication: The rolling circle model, Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 33, 473.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  94. Gilden, R. V., and Carp, R. I., 1966, Effects of cycloheximide and puromycin on synthesis of simian virus 40 T antigen in green monkey kidney cells, J. Bacteriol. 91, 1295.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  95. Gilden, R. V., Carp, R. I., Taguchi, F., and Defendi, V., 1965, The nature and localization of the SV40-induced complement-fixing antigen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 53, 684.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  96. Gilham, P. T., 1964, The synthesis of polynucleotide-celluloses and their use in the fractionation of polynucleotides, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 86, 4982.Google Scholar
  97. Girard, M., Marty, L., and Suarez, F., 1970, Capsid proteins of simain virus 40, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 40, 97.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  98. Girard, M., Marty, L., and Manteuil, S., 1974, Viral DNA-RNA hybrids in simian virus 40 infected cells: The simian virus 40 transcriptional intermediates, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 71, 1267.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  99. Girardi, A. J., and Defendi, V., 1970, Induction of SV40 transplantation antigen (TrAg) during the lytic cycle, Virology 42, 688.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  100. Goldstein, D. A., Hall, M. R., and Meinke, W., 1973, Properties of nucleoprotein complexes containing replicating polyoma DNA, J. Virol. 12, 887.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  101. Green, M. H., Miller, H. I., and Hendler, S., 1971, Isolation of a polyoma nucleoprotein complex from infected mouse cell cultures, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 68, 1032.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  102. Greenaway, P. J., and LeVine, D., 1973, Amino acid compositions of simian virus 40 structural. proteins, Biochem. Biophvs. Res. Commun. 52, 1221.Google Scholar
  103. Gromkova, R., and Goodgal, S. H., 1972, Action of Haemophilus endodeoxyribonuclease on biologically active deoxyribonucleic acid, J. Bacteriol. 109, 987.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  104. Habel, K., 1961, Resistance of polyoma virus immune animals to transplanted polyoma tumors, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 106, 722.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  105. Habel, K., 1965, Specific complement-fixing antigens in polyoma tumors and transformed cells, Virology 25, 55.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  106. Habel, K., and Eddy, B. E., 1963, Specificity of resistance to tumor challenge of polyoma and SV40 virus-immune hamsters, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 113, 1.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  107. Habel, K., Jensen, F. C., Pagano, J., and Koprowski, H., 1965, Specific complementfixing tumor antigen in SV40-transformed human cells, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 118, 4.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  108. Hall, M. R., Meinke, W., and Goldstein, D. A., 1973, Nucleoprotein complexes containing replicating simian virus 40 DNA: Comparison with polyoma nucleoprotein complexes, J. Virol. 12, 901.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  109. Hancock, R., and Weil, R., 1969, Biochemical evidence for induction by polyoma virus of replication of the chromosomes of mouse kidney cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 63, 1144.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  110. Hartley, J. W., Huebner, R. J., and Rowe, W. P., 1956, Serial propagation of adenoviruses (APC) in monkey kidney tissue cultures, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 92, 667.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  111. Hashimoto, K., Nakajima, K., Oda, K., and Shimojo, H., 1973, Complementation of translational defect for growth of human adenovirus type 2 in simian cells by an SV40-induced factor, J. Mol. Biol. 81, 207.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  112. Hatanaka, M., and Dulbecco, R., 1966, Induction of DNA synthesis by SV40, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 56, 736.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  113. Hedgpeth, J., Goodman, H. M., and Boyer, H. W., 1972, DNA nucleotide sequence restricted by the RI endonuclease, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 3448.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  114. Helinski, D. R., and Clewell, D. B., 1971, Circular DNA, in “Annual Review of Biochemistry,” pp. 899–942, Annual Reviews, Palo Alto, Calif.Google Scholar
  115. Henry, C. J., Slifkin, M., and Merkow, L., 1971, Mechanism of host cell restriction in African green monkey kidney cells abortively infected with human adenovirus type 2, Nat. New Biol. 233, 39.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  116. Herzberg, M. and Winocour, E., 1970, Simian virus 40 deoxyribonculeic acid transcription in vitro: Binding and transcription patterns with a mammalian ribonculeic acid polymerase, J. Virol. 6, 667.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  117. Hirai, K., and Defendi, V., 1972, Integration of SV40 DNA into the DNA of permissive monkey cells, J. Virol. 9, 705.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  118. Hirt, B., 1967, Selective extraction of polyoma DNA from infected mouse cell cultures, J. Mol. Biol. 26, 265.Google Scholar
  119. Hirt, B., 1969, Replicating molecules of polyoma DNA, J. Mol. Biol. 40, 141.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  120. Hirt, B., and Gesteland, R. F., 1971, Characterization of SV40 and polyoma virus, Lepetit. Colloq. Biol. Med. 2, 98.Google Scholar
  121. Hoggan, M. D., Rowe, W. P., Black, P. H., and Heubner, R. J., 1965, Production of “tumor-specific” antigens by oncogenic viruses during acute cytolytic infections, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 52, 12.Google Scholar
  122. Huang, E.-S., Estes, M. and Pagano, J., I972a, Structure and function of the polypeptides in simian virus 40. I. Existence of subviral deoxynucleoprotein complexes, J. Virol. 9, 923.Google Scholar
  123. Huang, E.-S., Nonoyana, M., and Pagano, J. S., 19726, Structure and function of the polypeptides in simian virus 40. II. Transcription of subviral deoxynucleoprotein complexes in vitro, J. Virol. 9, 930.Google Scholar
  124. Hudson, J., Goldstein, D., and Weil, R., 1970, A study on the transcription of the polyoma viral genome, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 65, 226.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  125. Huebner, R. J., Chanock, R. M., Rubin, B. A., and Casey, M. J., 1964, Induction by adenovirus type 7 of tumors in hamsters having the antigenic characteristics of SV40 virus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 52, 1333.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  126. Hummeler, K., Tomassini, N., and Sokol, F., 1970, Morphological aspects of the uptake of simian virus 40 by permissive cells, J. Virol. 6, 87.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  127. Iwata, A., and Consigli, R. A., 1971, Effect of phleomycin on polyoma virus synthesis in mouse embryo cells, J. Virol. 7, 29.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  128. Jackson, A. H., and Sugden, B. 1972, Inhibition by a-amanitin of simian virus 40-specific ribonucleic acid synthesis in nuclei of infected monkey cells, J. Virol. 10, 1086.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  129. Jaenisch, R., 1972, Evidence for SV40-specific RNA-containing virus and host-specific sequences, Nat. New Biol. 235, 46.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  130. Jaenisch, R., Mayer, A., and Levine, A. J., 1971, Replicating SV40 molecules containing closed circular template DNA strands, Nat. (London) 233, 72.Google Scholar
  131. Jerkofsky, M., and Rapp, F., 1973, Host cell DNA synthesis as a possible factor in the enhancement of replication of human adenoviruses in simian cells by SV40, Virology 51, 466.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  132. Kang, H. S., Eshbach, T. B., White, D. A., and Levine, A. J., 1971, Deoxyribonucleic acid replication in simian virus 40-infected cells. IV. Two different requirements for protein synthesis during simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid replication, J. Virol. 7, 112.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  133. Kaplan, J. C., Wilbert, S. M., and Black, P. H., 1972, Endonuclease activity associated with purified simian virus 40 virions, J. Virol. 9, 800.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  134. Kato, A. C., Bartok, K., Fraser, M. J., and Denhardt, D. T., 1973, Sensitivity of superhelical DNA to a single-strand specific endonuclease, Biochim. Biophvs. Acta 308, 68.Google Scholar
  135. Keller, W., and Crouch, R., 1972, Degradation of DNA RNA hybrids by ribonuclease H and DNA polymerases of cellular and viral origin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 3360.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  136. Kelly, T. J., Jr., and Lewis, A. M., 1973, Use of nondefective adenovirus-simian virus 40 hybrids for mapping the simian virus 40 genome, J. Virol. 12, 643.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  137. Kelly, T. J., Jr., and Rose, J. A., 1971, Simian virus 40 integration site in an adenovirus 7-SV40 hybrid DNA molecule, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 68, 1037.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  138. Kelly, T. J., Jr. and Smith, H. O., 1970, A restriction enzyme from Hemophilus influenza. II. Base sequence of the recognition site, J. Mol. Biol. 51, 393.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  139. Khera, K. S., Ashkenazi, A., Rapp, F. and Melnick, J. L., 1963, Immunity in hamsters to cells transformed in vitro and in vivo by SV40. Tests for antigenic relationships among the papovaviruses, J. Immunol. 91, 604.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  140. Khoury, G., 1970, An investigation of the properties of SV40-transformed human cells, Harvard Medical School Thesis.Google Scholar
  141. Khoury, G., and Martin, M. A., 1972, Comparison of SV40 DNA transcription in vivo and in vitro, Nat. New Biol. 238, 4.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  142. Khoury, G., Byrne, J. C., and Martin, M. A., 1972, Pattern of simian virus 40 DNA transcription after acute infection of permissive and non-permissive cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. SCi. USA 69, 1925.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  143. Khoury, G., Byrne, J. C., Takemoto, K. K., and Martin, M. A., 1973a, Patterns of simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid transcription. In transformed cells, J. Virol. 11, 54.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  144. Khoury, G., Martin, M. A., Lee, T. N. H., Danna, K. J., and Nathans, D., 1973b, A map of simian virus 40 transcription sites expressed in productively infected cells, J. Mol. Biol. 78, 377.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  145. Khoury, G., Lewis, A. M., Oxman, M. N., and Levine, A. S., 1973c, Strand orientation of SV40 transcription in cells infected by the nondefective adenovirus 2-SV40 hybrid viruses, Nat. New Biol., 246, 207.Google Scholar
  146. Khoury, G., Fareed, G. C., Berry, K., Martin, M. A., Lee, T. N. H.,and Nathans, D., 1974, Characterization of a rearrangement in viral DNA: Mapping of the circular SV40-like DNA containing a triplication of a specific one-third of the viral genome, J. Mol. Biol.,86, in press.Google Scholar
  147. Kidwell, W. R., Saral, R., Martin, R. G., and Ozer, H. L., 1972, Characterization of an endonuclease associated with simian virus 40 virions, J. Virol. 10, 410.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  148. Kiger, J. A., Jr., and Sinsheimer, R. L., 1969, Vegetative lambda DNA IV. Fractionation of replicating lambda DNA on benzoylated-naphthoylated DEAE cellulose, J. Mol. Biol. 40, 467.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  149. Kit, S., 1967, Enzyme inductions in cell cultures during productive and abortive infections by papovavirus SV40, in “The Molecular Biology of Viruses” (J. S. Colter and W. Paranchyeh, eds.), pp. 495–525, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  150. Kit, S., 1968, Viral-induced enzymes and viral carcinogenesis, Adv. Cancer Res. 11, 73.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  151. Kit, S., and Nakajima, K., 1971, Analysis of the molecular forms of simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid synthesized in cycloheximide-treated cell cultures, J. Virol. 7, 87.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  152. Kit, S., Dubbs, D. R., and Frearson, P. M., 1966, Enzymes of nucleic acid metabolism in cells infected with polyoma virus, Cancer Res. 26, 638.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  153. Kit, S., Melnick, J. L., Anken, M., Dubbs, D. R., deTorres, R. A., and Kitahara, T., 1967, Non-identity of some simian-virus 40-induced enzymes with tumor antigen, J. Virol. 1, 684.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  154. Kit, S., Kurimura, T., Salvi, M. L., and Dubbs, D. R., 1968, Activation of infectious SV40 DNA synthesis in transformed cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 60, 1239.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  155. Kitahara, T., and Melnick, J. L., 1965, Thermal separation of the synthesis of papovavirus SV40 tumor and virus antigen, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 120, 709.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  156. Koch, M. A., and Sabin, A. B., 1963, Specificity of virus-induced resistance to transplantation of polyoma and SV40 tumors in adult hamsters, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 113, 4.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  157. Koprowski, H., Jensen, F. C., and Steplewski, Z., 1967, Activation of production of infectious tumor virus SV40 in heterokaryon cultures, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 58, 127.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  158. Laipis, P., and Levine, A. J., 1973, Deoxyribonucleic acid replication in SV40-infected cells. IX. The inhibition of a gap filling step during discontinuous synthesis of SV40 DNA, Virology 56, 580.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  159. Lake, R. S., Barban, S., and Salzman, N. P., 1973, Resolutions and identification of the core deoxynucleoproteins of the simian virus 40, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 54, 640.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  160. Latarjet, R., Cramer, R., and Montagnier, L., 1967, Inactivation by UV-, X-, and a-radiations of the infecting and transforming capacities of polyoma virus, Virology 33, 104.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  161. Lavi, S., and Winocour, E., 1972, Acquisition of sequences homologous to host deoxyribonucleic acid by closed circular simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid, J. Virol. 9, 309.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  162. Lazarus, H. M., Sporn, M. B., Smith, J. M., and Henderson, W. R., 1967, Purification of T antigen from nuclei of simian virus 40-induced hamster tumors, J. Virol. 5, 1093.Google Scholar
  163. Lebowitz, P., and Khoury, G., 1974, The SV40 DNA segment of the adenovirus 7-SV40 hybrid, E46+, and its transcription during permissive infection of monkey kidney cells, J. Virol.,in press.Google Scholar
  164. Lee, Y., Mendecki, J., and Brawerman, G., 1971, A polynucleotide segment rich in adenylic acid in the rapidly-labeled polyribosomal RNA component of mouse sarcoma 180 ascites cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 68, 1331.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  165. Levin, M. J., Crumpacker, C. S., Lewis, A. M., Oxman, M. N., Henry, P. H., and Rowe, W. P., 1971, Studies of nondefective adenovirus 2-simian virus 40 hybrid viruses. II. Relationship of adenovirus 2 deoxyribonucleic acid and simian virus 40 deoxyribonculeic acid in the Ad2+ND, genome, J. Virol. 7, 343.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  166. Levine, A. J., 1971, Induction of mitochondria) DNA synthesis in monkey cells infected by SV40 and (or) treated with calf serum. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 68, 717.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  167. Levine, A. J., and Teresky, A. K., 1970, Deoxyribonucleic acid replication in simian virus 40-infected cells. II. Detection and characterization of simian virus 40 pseudovirions, J. Virol. 5, 451.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  168. Levine, A. J., Kang, H. S., and Billheimer, F., 1970, DNA replication in SV40infected cells. I. Analysis of replicating SV40 DNA, J. Mol. Biol. 50, 549.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  169. Levine, A. S., Levin, M. J. Oxman, M. N., and Lewis, A. M., 1973, Studies of nondefective adenovirus 2-simian virus 40 hybrid viruses. VII. Characterization of the simian virus 40 RNA species induced by five nondefective hybrid viruses, J. Virol. 11, 672.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  170. Lewis, A. M., and Rowe, W. P., 1971, Studies on nondefective adenovirus-simian virus 40 hybrid viruses, J. Virol. 7, 189.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  171. Lewis, A. M., Levin, M. J., Wiese, W. H., Crumpacker, C. S., and Henry, P. H., 1969, A nondefective (competent) adenovirus-SV40 hybrid isolated from the Ad2-SV40 hybrid population, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 63, 1128.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  172. Lewis, A. M., Levine, A. S., Crumpacker, C. S., Levin, M. J., Samaha, R. J., and Henry, P. H., 1973, Studies of nondefective adenovirus 2-simian virus 40 hybrid viruses. V. Isolation of five hybrids which differ in their simian virus 40-specific biological properties, J. Virol. 11, 655.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  173. Linstrom, D. M., and Dulbecco, R., 1972, Strand orientation of simian virus 40 transcription in productively infected cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 1517.Google Scholar
  174. McCutchan, J. H., and Pagano, J. S., 1968, Enhancement of the infectivity of simian virus 40 deoxyronucleic acid with diethylamino-ethyldextran, J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 41, 351.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  175. Magnusson, G., 1973, Hydroxyurea-induced accumulation of short fragments during polyoma DNA replication. I. Characterization of fragments, J. Virol. 12, 600.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  176. Magnusson, G., Pigiet, V., Winnacker, E. L., Abrams, R., and Reichard, P., 1973, RNA-linked short DNA fragments during polyoma replication, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 70, 412.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  177. Manteuil, S., Pages, J., Stehelin, D., and Girard, M., 1973, Replication of simian virus 40 deoxyriboncleic acid: Analysis of the one-step growth cycle, J. Virol. 11, 98.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  178. Martin, M. A., 1970, Characteristics of SV40 DNA transcription during lytic infection, abortive infection, and in transformed mouse cells, Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 35, 833.Google Scholar
  179. Martin, M. A., and Axelrod, D., 1969a, SV40 gene activity during lytic infection and in a series of SV40 transformed mouse cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 64, 1203.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  180. Martin, M. A., and Axelrod, D., 19696, Polyoma virus gene activity during lytic infection and in transformed animal cells, Science (Wash. D.C.) 164, 68.Google Scholar
  181. Martin, M. A., and Khoury, G., 1973, Transcription of SV40 DNA in lytically infected and transformed cells, in “Virus Research” (C. F. Fox and W. S. Robinson, eds.), pp. 33–50, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  182. May, E., May, P., and Weil, R., 1973, “Early” virus-specific RNA may contain information necessary for chromosome replication and mitosis induced by simian virus 40, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 70, 1658.Google Scholar
  183. Mayor, H. D., Stinebaugh, S. E., Jamison, R. M., Jordan, L. E., and Melnick, J. L., 1962, Immunofluorescent, cytochemical, and microcytological studies on the growth of the simian vacuolating virus (SV 40) in tissue culture, Exp. Mol. Pathol. 1, 397.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  184. Melnick, J. L., 1962, Papova virus group, Science (Wash. D.C.) 135, 1128.Google Scholar
  185. Melnick, J. L., and Rapp, F., 1965, The use of antiviral compounds in analyzing the sequential steps in the replication of SV40 papovavirus, Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 130, 291PubMedGoogle Scholar
  186. Melnick, J. L., 1962, Papovavirus group, Science, 135, 1128.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  187. Michel, M. R., Hirt, B., and Weil, R., 1967, Mouse cellular DNA enclosed in polyoma viral capsids (pseudovirions), Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 58, 1381.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  188. Middleton, J. H., Edgell, M. H., and Hutchison C. A., III, 1972, Specific fragmentation of OX174 deoxyribonucleic acid produced by a restriction enzyme from Haemophilus aegtticus, endonuclease 2, J. Virol. 10, 42.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  189. Morrow, J. F., and Berg, P., 1972, Cleavage of simian virus 40 DNA at a unique site by a bacterial restriction enzyme, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 3365.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  190. Morrow, J. F., and Berg, P., 1973, The location of the T4 gene 32 protein binding site on SV40 DNA, J. Virol. 12, 1631.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  191. Morrow, J. F., Berg, P., Kelly, T. J., Jr., and Lewis, A. M., 1973, Mapping of simian virus 40 early functions on the viral chromosome, J. Virol. 12, 653.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  192. Mueller, N., Zemla, J., and Brandner, G., 1973, Strand switch during in vivo polyoma transcription, FEBS (Fed. Eur. Biochem. Soc.) 31, 222.Google Scholar
  193. Mulder, C., and Delius, H., 1972, Specificity of the break produced by restricting endonuclease R, in simian virus 40 DNA, as revealed by partial denaturation mapping, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 3215.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  194. Murakami, W. T., Fine, R., Harrington, M. R., and Ben Sassan, Z., 1968, Properties and amino acid composition of polyoma virus purified by zonal ultracentrifugation, J. Mol. Biol. 36, 153.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  195. O’Conor, G. T., Rabson, A. S., Malmgren, R. A., Berezesky, I. K., and Paul, F. J., 1965, Morphologic observations of green monkey kidney cells after single and double infection with adenovirus 12 and simian virus 40, J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 34, 679.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  196. Oda, K., and Dulbecco, R., 1968a, Induction of cellular mRNA synthesis in BSC-1 cells infected by SV40, Virology 35, 439.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  197. Oda, K., and Dulbecco, R., 19686, Regulation of transcription of the SV40 DNA in productively infected and in transformed cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 60, 525.Google Scholar
  198. Okazaki, R., Okazaki, T., Sakabe, K., Sugimoto, K., and Sugino, A., 1968, Mechanism of DNA chain growth. I. Possible discontinuity and unusual secondary structure of newly synthesized chains, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 59, 598.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  199. Opschoor, A., Pouwels, P. H., Knijnenburg, C. M., and Aten, J. B. T., 1968, Viscosity and sedimentation of circular native deoxyribonucleic acid, J. Mol. Biol. 37, 13.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  200. Oxman, M. N., and Levin, M. J., 1971, Interferon and transcription of early virus-specific RNA in cells infected with simian virus 40, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 68, 299.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  201. Oxman, M. N., Rowe, W. P., and Black, P. H., 1967, Differential effects of interferon on SV-40 and adenovirus T antigen formation in cells infected with SV40 virus, adenovirus, and adenovirus-SV40 hybrid virues, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 57, 941.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  202. Oxman, M. N., Takemoto, K. K., and Eckhart, W., 1972, Polyoma T antigen synthesis by temperature-sensitive mutants of polyoma virus, Virology 49, 675.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  203. Oxman, M. N., Levin, M. J., and Lewis, A. M., 1974, Control of SV40 gene expression in adenovirus-SV40 hybrid viruses: The synthesis of hybrid adenovirus 2-SV40 RNA molecules in cells infected with a nondefective adenovirus 2-SV40 hybrid virus, J. Virol.,in press.Google Scholar
  204. Ozanne, B., Sharp, P. A., and Sambrook, J., 1973, Transcription of simian virus 40. II. Hybridization of RNA extracted from different lines of transformed cells to the separated strands of simian virus 40 DNA, J. Virol. 12, 90.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  205. Ozer, H. L., 1972, Synthesis and assembly of simian virus 40. I. Differential synthesis of intact virions and empty shells, J. Virol. 9, 41.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  206. Ozer, H., and Takemoto, K. K., 1969, Site of host restriction of simian virus 40 mutants in an established African green monkey kidney cell line, J. Virol. 4, 408.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  207. Ozer, H. L., and Tegtmeyer, P., 1972, Synthesis and assembly of simian virus 40. II. Synthesis of the major capsid protein and its incorporation into viral particles, J. Virol. 9, 52.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  208. Pages, J., Manteuil, S., Stehelin, D., Fiszman, M., Marx, M., and Girard, M., 1973, Relationship between replication of simian virus 40 DNA and specific events of the host cell cycle, J. Virol. 12, 99.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  209. Palacios, R., and Schinke, R. T., 1973, Identification and isolation of ovalbuminsynthesizing polysomes, J. Biol. Chem. 248, 1424.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  210. Patch, C. T., Lewis, A. M., and Levine, A. S., 1972, Evident for a transcription-control region of simian virus 40 in the adenovirus 2-simian virus 40 hybrid, Ad2+ND, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 3375.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  211. Pettijohn, D., and Kamiya, 1967, Interaction of RNA polymerase with polyoma DNA, J. Mol. Biol. 29, 275.Google Scholar
  212. Pope, J. H., and Rowe, W. P., 1964, Detection of a specific antigen in SV40 transformed cells by immunofluorescence, J. Exp. Med. 120, 121.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  213. Potter, C. W., McLaughlin, B. C., and Oxford, J. S., 1969, Simian virus 40-induced T and tumor antigens, J. Virol. 4, 574.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  214. Rabson, A. S., O’Conor, G. T., Berezesky, I. K., and Paul, F. J, 1964, Enhancement of adenovirus growth in African green monkey kidney cell cultures by SV40, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 116, 187.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  215. Ralph, R. K., and Colter, J. S., 1972, Evidence for the integration of polyoma virus DNA in a lytic system, Virology 48, 49.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  216. Rapp, F., and Trulock, S. C., 1970, Susceptibility to superinfection of simian cells transformed by SV40, Virology 40, 961.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  217. Rapp, F., Kitahara, T., Butel, J. S., and Melnick, J. L., 1964a, Synthesis of SV40 tumor antigen during replication of simian papovavirus (SV40), Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 52, 1138.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  218. Rapp, F., Melnick, J. L., Butel, J. S., and Kitahara, T., 1964b, The incorporation of SV40 genetic material into adenovirus 7 as measured by intranuclear synthesis of SV40 tumor antigen, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 52, 1348.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  219. Rapp, F., Butel, J. S., and Melnick, J. L., 1964c, Virus-induced intranuclear antigen in cells transformed by papovavirus SV40, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 116, 1131.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  220. Reeder, R. H., and Roeder, R. G., 1972, Ribosomal RNA synthesis in isolated nuclei, J. Mol. Biol. 67, 433.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  221. Reznikoff, C., Tegtmeyer, P., Dohan, C., Jr., and Enders, J. F., 1972, Isolation of AGMK cells partially resistant to SV40: Identification of the resistant step, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 141, 740.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  222. Ritzi, E., and Levine, A. J., 1969, Deoxyribonucleic acid replication in simian virus 40-infected cells. III. Comparison of simian virus 40 lytic infection in three different monkey kidney cell lines, J. Virol. 5, 686.Google Scholar
  223. Robb, J. A., and Martin, R. G., 1972, Genetic analysis of simian virus 40. III. Characterization of a temperature-sensitive mutant blocked at an early stage of productive infection in monkey cells, J. Virol. 9, 956.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  224. Roblin, R., Harle, E., and Dulbecco, R., 1971, Polyoma virus proteins, I. Multiple virion components Virology 45, 555.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  225. Roeder, R. G., and Rutter, W. J., 1969, Multiple forms of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in eukaryotic organisms, Nature (Lond.) 224, 234.Google Scholar
  226. Roeder, R. G., and Rutter, W. J., 1970, Specific nucleolar and nucleoplasmic RNA polymerases, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 65, 675.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  227. Rothschild, H., and Black, P. H., 1970, Analysis of SV40-induced transformation of hamster kidney tissue in vitro. VII. Induction of SV40 virus from transformed hamster cell clones by various agents, Virology 42, 251.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  228. Rovera, G., Baserga, R., and Defendi, V., 1972, Early increase in nuclear acidic protein synthesis after SV40 infection, Nat. New Biol. 237, 240.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  229. Rowe, W. P., and Baum, S. G., 1964, Evidence for a possible genetic hybrid between adenovirus type 7 and SV40 viruses, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 52, 1340.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  230. Rowe, W. P., and Baum, S. G., 1965, Studies of adenovirus-SV40 hybrid viruses. II. Defectiveness of the hybrid particles, J. Exp. Med. 122, 955.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  231. Rozenblatt, S., and Winocour, E., 1972, Covalentlÿ linked cell and SV40-specific sequences in an RNA from productively infected cells, Virology 50, 558.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  232. Rozenblatt, S., Lavi, S., Singer, M. F., and Winocour, E., 1973, Acquisition of sequences homologous to host DNA by closed circular simian virus 40 DNA. III. Host sequences, J. Virol. 12, 501.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  233. Rush, M. G., and Warner, R. C., 1970, Alkali denaturation of covalently closed circular duplex deoxyribonucleic acid, J. Biol. Chem. 245, 2704.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  234. Sabin, A. B., Shein, H. M., Koch, M. A. and Enders, J. F., 1964, Specific complement-fixing tumor antigens in human cells morphologically transformed by SV40 virus, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 52, 1316.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  235. Sack, G. H., and Nathans, D., 1963, Studies of SV40 DNA VI. Cleavage of SV40 DNA by restriction endonuclease from Hemophilus parainfluenza, Virology 51, 517.Google Scholar
  236. Salzman, N. P., and Thoren, M. M., 1973, Inhibition in the joining of DNA intermediates to growing simian virus 40 chains, J. Virol. 11, 721.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  237. Salzman, N. P., Fareed, G. C., Sebring, E. D., and Thoren, M. M., 1973a, The mechanism of replication of SV40 DNA, in Virus Research ( C. F. Fox and W. S. Robinson, eds.), pp. 71–87, Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  238. Salzman, N. P., Sebring, E. D., and Radonovich, M., 19736, Unwinding of parental strands simian virus 40 DNA replication, J. Virol. 12, 669.Google Scholar
  239. Sambrook, J., and Shatkin, A. J., 1969, Polynucleotide ligase activity in cells infected with simian virus 40, polyoma virus, or vaccinia virus, J. Virol. 4, 719.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  240. Sambrook, J. F., Westphal, H., Srinivasan, P. R., and Dulbecco, R., 1968, The integrated state of viral DNA in SV40-transformed cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 60, 1288.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  241. Sambrook, J., Sharp, P. A., and Keller, W., 1972, Transcription of simian virus 40 I. Separation of the strands of SV40 DNA and hybridization of the separated strands to RNA extracted from lytically infected and transformed cells, J. Mol. Biol. 70, 57.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  242. Sauer, G., 1971, Apparent differences in transcriptional control in cells productively infected and transformed by SV40, Nat. New Biol. 231, 135.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  243. Sauer, G., and Kidwai, J. R., 1968, The transcription of the SV40 genome in productively infected and transformed cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 61, 1256.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  244. Schechter, I., 1973, Biologically and chemically pure mRNA coding for a mouse immunoglobin L-chain prepared with the aid of antibodies and immobilized oligothymidine. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 70, 2256.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  245. Schlumberger, H. D., Anderer, F. A., and Koch, M. A., 1968, Structure of the simian virus 40. IV. The polypeptide chains of the virus particle, Virology 36, 42.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  246. Sebring, E. D., Kelly, T. J., Jr., Thoren, M. M., and Salzman, N. P., 1971, Structure of replicating simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid molecules, J. Virol. 8, 478.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  247. Seebeck, T., and Weil, R., 1974, Polyoma viral DNA replicated as a nucleoprotein complex in close association with the host cell chromatin, J. Virol., 13, 567.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  248. Sharp, P. A., Sugden, B., and Sambrook, J., 1973, Detection of two restriction endonuclease activities in Haemophilus parainfluenzae using analytical agaroserethidium bromide electrophoresis, Biochemistry 12, 3055.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  249. Sheldon, R., Jurale, C., and Kates, J., 1972, Detection of polyadenylic acid squences in viral and eukaryotic RNA, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 417.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  250. Shih, T. Y., Khoury, G., and Martin, M. A., 1973, In vitro transcription of the viral specific sequences present in the chromatin of SV40-transformed cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 70, 3506.Google Scholar
  251. Shimono, H., and Kaplan, A. S., 1969, Correlation between the synthesis of DNA and histones in polyoma virus-infected mouse embryo cells, Virology 37, 690.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  252. Shiroki, K., and Shimojo, H., 1971, Transformation of green monkey kidney cells by SV40 genome: The establishment of transformed cell lines and the replication of human adenoviruses and SV40 in transformed cells, Virology 45, 163.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  253. Sjogren, H. O., Hellstrom, I., and Klein, G., 1961, Transplantation of polyoma virus-induced tumors in mice, Cancer Res. 21, 329.Google Scholar
  254. Smith, H. O., and Wilcox, K., 1970, A restriction enzyme from Hemophilus influenza I. Purification and general properties, J. Mol. Biol. 51, 379.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  255. Stewart, S. E., Eddy, B. E., Gochenour, A. M., Borgese, N. G., and Grubbs, G. E., 1957, The inductions of neoplasms with a substance released from mouse tumors by tissue culture, Virology 3, 380.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  256. Stirpe, F., and Fiume, L., 1967, Studies on the pathogenesis of liver necrosis by a-amanitin. Effect of a-amanitin on ribonucleic acid synthesis and on ribonucleic acid polymerase in mouse liver nuclei, Biochem. J. 105, 779.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  257. Sugden, B., and Keller, W., 1973, Mammalian deoxyribonucleic acid-dependent ribonucleic acid polymerases I. Purification and properties of an a-amanitinsensitive ribonucleic acid polymerase and stimulatory factors from HeLa and KB cells, J. Biol. Chem. 248, 3777.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  258. Summers, W. C. and Siegal, R. B., 1970, Transcription of late phage RNA by T7 RNA polymerase, Nature (Lond.) 228, 1160.Google Scholar
  259. Sweet, B. H., and Hilleman, M. R., 1960, The vacuolating virus, SV40, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 105, 420.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  260. Swetly, P., Barbanti-Brodano, G., Knowles, B., and Koprowski, H., 1969, Response of simian virus 40-transformed cell lines to superinfection with simian virus 40 and its deoxyribonucleic acid, J. Virol. 4, 348.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  261. Tai, H. T., Smith, C. A., Sharp, P. A., and Vinograd, J., 1972, Sequence heterogeneity in closed simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid, J. Virol. 9, 317.Google Scholar
  262. Takemoto, K. K., and Habel, K., 1965, Hamster ascitic fluids containing complement-fixing antibody against virus-induced tumor antigens, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 120, 124.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  263. Takemoto, K. K., and Martin, M. A., 1970, SV40 thermosensitive mutant: Synthesis of viral DNA and virus-induced proteins at nonpermissive temperatures, Virology 42, 938.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  264. Takemoto, K. K., and Mullarkey, M. F., 1973, Human papovavirus, BK strain: Biological studies including antigenic relationship to simian virus 40, J. Virol. 12, 625.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  265. Takemoto, K. K., Kirschstein, R. L., and Habel, K., 1966, Mutants of simian virus 40 differing in plaque size, oncogenicity, and heat sensitivity, J. Bacteriol. 92, 990.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  266. Tan, K. B., and Sokol, F., 1972, Structural proteins of simian virus 40: Phosphoproteins, J. Virol. 10, 985.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  267. Tan, K. B., and Sokol, F., 1973, Phosphorylation of simian virus 40 proteins in a cell-free system, J. Virol. 12, 676.Google Scholar
  268. Tegtmeyer, P., 1972, Simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis: The viral replicon, J. Virol. 10, 591.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  269. Tevethia, S. S., and Rapp, F., 1965, Demonstration of new surface antigens in cells transformed by papovavirus SV40 by cytotoxic tests, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 120, 455.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  270. Thoren, M. M., Sebring, E. D., and Salzman, N. P., 1972, Specific initiation site for simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid replication, J. Virol. 10, 462.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  271. Thorne, H. V., 1973, Cyclic varation in susceptibility of Balb-C 3T3 cells to polyoma virus, J. Gen. Virol. 18, 163.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  272. Thorne, H. V., Evans, J., and Warden, D., 1968, Detection of biologically defective molecules in component I of polyoma virus DNA, Nature (Lond.) 219, 728.Google Scholar
  273. Todaro, G. J., and Martin, G. M., 1967, Increased susceptibility of Down’s syndrome fibroblasts to transformation by SV40, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 124, 1232.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  274. Todaro, G. J., Green, H., and Swift, M. R., 1966, Susceptibility of human diploid fibroblast strains to transformation by SV40 virus, Science (Wash. D.C.) 153, 1252.Google Scholar
  275. Tonegawa, S., Walter, G., Bernardini, A. and Dulbecco, R., 1970, Transcription of the SV40 genome in transformed cells and during lytic infection, Cold Spring Harb. Symp. Quant. Biol. 35, 833.Google Scholar
  276. Trilling, D. M., and Axelrod, D., 1970, Encapsidation of free host DNA by simian virus 40: A simian virus 40 pseudovirus, Science (Wash. D.C.) 168, 268.Google Scholar
  277. Trilling, D., and Axelrod, D., 1972, Analysis of the three components of simian virus 40: Pseudo-, mature, and defective viruses, Virology 47, 360.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  278. Uchida, S., Yoshiike, K., Watanabe, S., and Furano, A., 1968, Antigen-forming defective viruses of simian virus 40, Virology 34, 1.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  279. Vinograd, J., and Lebowitz, J., 1966, Physical and topological properties of circular DNA, J. Gen. Physiol. 49, 103.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  280. Vinograd, J., Lebowitz, J., Radloff, R., Watson, R., and Laipis, P., 1965, The twisted circular form of polyoma viral DNA, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 53, 1104.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  281. Vinograd, J., Lebowitz, J., and Watson, R., 1968, Early and late helix-coil transitions in closed circular DNA. The number of superhelical turns in polyoma DNA, J. Mol. Biol. 33, 173.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  282. Walter, G., Roblin, R., and Dulbecco, R., 1972, Protein synthesis in simian virus 40-infected monkey cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 69, 921.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  283. Wang, J. C., 1971, Interaction between DNA and an Escherichia coli protein ω, J. Mol. Biol. 55, 523.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  284. Warnaar, S. O., and deMol, A. W., 1973, Characterization of two simian virus 40-specific RNA molecules from infected BSC-1 cells, J. Virol. 12, 124.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  285. Watkins, J. F., and Dulbecco, R., 1967, Production of SV40 virus in heterokaryons of transformed and susceptible cells, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 58, 1396.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  286. Weil, R., and Vinograd, J., 1963, The cyclic helix and cyclic coil forms of polyoma viral DNA, Proc- Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 50, 730.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  287. Weinberg, R. A., Warnaar, S. O., and Winocour, E., 1972a, Isolation and characterization of simian virus 40 ribonucleic acid, J. Virol. 10, 193.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  288. Weinberg, R. A., Ben-Ishai, Z., and Newbold, J. E., 19726, Poly A associated with SV40 messenger RNA, Nat. N. Biol. 238, 111.Google Scholar
  289. Weinberg, R. A., Ben-Ishai, Z., and Newbold, J. E., 1974, SV40-transcription in productively infected and transformed cells, J. Virol. 13, 1263.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  290. Westphal, H., 1970, SV40 DNA strand selection by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase, J. Mol. Biol. 50, 407.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  291. Westphal, H., 1971, Transcription of superhelical and relaxed circular SV40 DNA by E. coli RNA polymerase in the presence of rifampicin, Lepetit. Colloq. Biol. Med. 2, 77.Google Scholar
  292. Westphal, H., and Dulbecco, R., 1968, Viral DNA in polyoma-and SV40-transformed lines, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 59, 1158.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  293. Westphal, H., Delius, H., and Mulder, C., 1973, Visualization of SV40 in vitro transcription complexes, Lepetit, Colloq. Biol. Med. 4, 183.Google Scholar
  294. Weyer, G. H., Kit, S., and Dubbs, D. R., 1970, Initial site of synthesis of virus during rescue of simian virus 40 from heterokaryons of simian virus 40-transformed and susceptible cells, J. Virol. 5, 578.Google Scholar
  295. White, M., and Eason, R., 1971, Nucleoprotein complexes in simian virus 40-infected cells, J. Virol. 8, 363.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  296. Wickus, G. G., and Robbins, P. W., 1973, Plasma membrane proteins of normal and Rous sarcoma virus-transformed chick-embryo fibroblasts, Nat. New Biol. 245, 65.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  297. Winnacker, E. L., Magnusson, G., and Reichard, P., 1972, Replication of polyoma DNA in isolated nuclei. I. Characterization of the system from mouse fibroblast 3T6 cells, J. Mol. Biol. 72, 523.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  298. Winocour, E., and Robbins, E., 1970, Histone synthesis in polyoma and SV40-infected cell DNA, Virology 40, 307.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  299. Yelton, D. B., and Aposhian, H. V., 1972, Polyoma pseudovirions. I. Sequence of events in primary mouse embryo cells leading to pseudovirus production, J. Virol. 10, 340.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  300. Yoshiike, K., 1968a. Studies on DNA from low-density particles of SV40. I. Heterogeneous defective virions produced by successive undiluted passages, Virology 34, 391.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  301. Yoshiike, K., 1968b, Studies on DNA from low-density particles of SV40. II. Noninfectious virions associated with a large-plaque variant, Virology 34, 402.Google Scholar
  302. Yoshiike, K., and Furano, A., 1969, Heterogeneous DNA of simian virus 40, Fed. Proc. 28, 1899.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  303. Yoshiike, K., Furano, A., and Suzuki, K., 1972, Denaturation maps of complete and defective simian virus 40 DNA molecules, J. Mol. Biol. 70, 415.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  304. Zain, B. S., Dhar, R., Weissman, S. M., Lebowitz, P., and Lewis, A. M., 1973, Preferred site for initiation of RNA transcription by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase within the simian virus 40 DNA segment of the nondefective adenovirus-simian virus 40 hybrid viruses Ad2+ND, and Ad2+ND3, J. Virol. 11, 682.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman P. Salzman
    • 1
  • George Khoury
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Biology of Viruses National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

Personalised recommendations