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Reproduction of Reoviridae

  • Wolfgang K. Joklik
Part of the Comprehensive Virology book series (CV, volume 2)

Abstract

The discovery by Gomatos and Tamm (1963a) that reovirus RNA is double-stranded caused great interest since, although double-stranded RNA was at that time under active investigation as the replicative form of viral genomes consisting of single-stranded RNA, it provided the first source of stable double-stranded RNA. Equally significant was the subsequent demonstration that the reovirus genome consists of a unique set of several distinct molecules; this upset the previously held notion that the genomes of all viruses consist of a single nucleic acid molecule.

Keywords

Nucleoside Triphosphate Minus Strand Bluetongue Virus Rice Dwarf Virus Reovirus Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang K. Joklik
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and ImmunologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA

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