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Specific Heat, Optical, and Transport Properties of Hexagonal Tungsten Bronzes

  • C. N. King
  • J. A. Benda
  • R. L. Greene
  • T. H. Geballe

Abstract

The tungsten bronzes are a series of nonstoichimetric compounds of the general formula M x WO3, where M is usually an alkali metal atom. In this paper the cubic and hexagonal crystal structures are compared. Each structure is composed of linked WO6 octahedra, with M atoms filling the available cavities. In the cubic structure the WO6 matrix has rectangular channels in which the M atom is located. The cubic structure has all M sites full when x = 1. The hexagonal structure is composed of three- and six-member rings of WO6 octahedra. The M-atom sites are located in the hexagonal channels, with x = 1/3 corresponding to all sites full. The radii of the inscribed spheres of the cavities available for occupation by the M atoms are 0.96 Å and 2 Å in the cubic and hexagonal structures, respectively. The smaller M ions such as Na+ (0.95 Å) adopt the cubic structure for 0.5 ≲ x ≲ 1, whereas K+ (1.33 Å) and Rb+ (1.47 Å) form hexagonal bronzes.

Keywords

Heat Capacity Tungsten Bronze Plasma Edge Alkali Metal Atom Hexagonal Crystal Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. N. King
    • 1
  • J. A. Benda
    • 1
  • R. L. Greene
    • 1
  • T. H. Geballe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied PhysicsStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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