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Precision Measurement of Q-Values by Means of the Munich Time-of-Flight System and the Q3D-Spectrograph

  • P. Glässel
  • E. Huenges
  • P. Maier-Komor
  • H. Rösler
  • H. J. Scheerer
  • H. Vonach
  • D. Semrad

Abstract

The measurement of Q-values of nuclear reactions is one of the most important methods for determining the masses of unstable nuclei which has contributed much to the present knowledge of nuclear masses. In most cases reactions with charged particles in the entrance and exit channel were used and the Q-value was determined by measurement of the magnetic rigidity of both the bombarding particles and the reaction products in homogeneous field iron magnets. Although the magnetic induction B itself can be measured to about 10−6 by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the magnetic rigidities Bδ and thus the particle energies could be obtained only with accuracies of some parts in 104 /1/. This is mainly caused by two effects:
  1. 1)

    Even in high quality iron magnets the average field may deviate from the field of the location of the NMR probe by some parts in loo. Furthermore this difference may change by about 10−4 due to differen­tial hysteresis.

     
  2. 2)

    In the determination of the magnetic rigidity of the bombarding particles in the analyzing magnets a further uncertainty arises from the finite object and image slit width. Therefore the radius of the trajectories of the particles is usually not defined better than to about 5•10−4. Thus the actual radius of curvature may deviate from the nominal radius defined by the centres of the slits by a few parts in 104 because of asymmetries in the beam profiles at the slit positions.

     

Keywords

Precision Measurement Exit Channel Main Beam Energy Fluctuation Focal Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Glässel
    • 1
  • E. Huenges
    • 1
  • P. Maier-Komor
    • 1
  • H. Rösler
    • 1
  • H. J. Scheerer
    • 1
  • H. Vonach
    • 2
  • D. Semrad
    • 3
  1. 1.Beschleunigerlaboratorium der UniversitätTechnischen UniversitätMünchenDeutschland
  2. 2.Institut für Radiumforschung und KernphysikWienÖsterreich
  3. 3.Physikalisches Institut der UniversitätLinzÖsterreich

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