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Plasma Lipoproteins

  • June K. Lloyd
  • Audrey S. Fosbrooke

Abstract

Lipoproteins are macromolecules in which the water insoluble lipids are transported in plasma. Four main lipoprotein classes have been defined in human plasma. Each of these contains esterified and non-esterified cholesterol, phospholipid and triglyceride, though in differing and characteristic proportions. Non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) is transported as a complex with albumin; the albumin-fatty acid complex is not, however, conventionally regarded as one of the lipoproteins. The terminology used for the classification of the lipoprotein classes depends upon the methods used for their separation; a description of the methodology is thus a prerequisite to any discussion of terminology or physiology.

Keywords

Fatty Acid Composition Cholesterol Ester Plasma Lipoprotein Familial Hypercholesterolaemia Individual Phospholipid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Company Ltd 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • June K. Lloyd
    • 1
  • Audrey S. Fosbrooke
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child Health, Institute of Child HealthUniversity of LondonUK

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