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Biological Aspects of Affective Psychoses

  • Edward J. Sachar
  • Alec J. Coppen

Abstract

The past two decades have witnessed an extraordinary thrust of research into the biology of the depressive illnesses and manic-depressive psychoses. The assumption implicit in most of this work is that these illnesses are associated with disturbances in hypothalamic and limbic system functions and that an important role in these disturbances may be played by alterations in brain neu-rochemistry, particularly in the metabolism of the monaminergic neurotransmitters.

Keywords

Depressed Patient Affective Disorder Biogenic Amine Plasma Cortisol Cortisol Secretion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward J. Sachar
    • 1
  • Alec J. Coppen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryAlbert Einstein College of MedicineBronxUSA
  2. 2.Neuropsychiatry UnitMedical Research CouncilEpsom, SurreyEngland

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