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Effects of Narcotic Analgesics on Brain Function

  • Doris H. Clouet

Abstract

Drugs which produce dependence have one characteristic in common: in effective doses, they induce alteration in behavior. This characteristic, however, does not define addictive drugs, since other drugs modify behavior without inducing addiction. The behavioral responses to addictive drugs do indicate the central nervous system as the target tissue, and nervous function as the site of drug intervention, during the development of dependence to chronic use of opiates or other drugs which produce dependence.

Keywords

Physical Dependence Narcotic Analgesic Pharmacological Response Morphine Administration Biochemical Pharmacology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Doris H. Clouet
    • 1
  1. 1.Testing and Research LaboratoryNew York State Narcotic Addiction Control CommissionBrooklynUSA

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