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Cotton Plant and Insect Constituents That Control Boll Weevil Behavior and Development

  • P. A. Hedin
  • A. C. Thompson
  • R. C. Gueldner
Part of the Recent Advances in Phytochemistry book series (RBIO, volume 10)

Abstract

The boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman, was introduced from Mexico into the United States (near Brownsville, Texas) about 189271. By 1922 the pest has spread into cottongrowing areas of the United States from the eastern two-thirds of Texas and Oklahoma to the Atlantic Ocean. Its recent extension into west Texas now threatens cotton in New Mexico, Mexico, Arizona and California. As early as 1895, recognition of the tremendous damage caused by this insect was noted, and Townsend (1895) suggested that cotton growing be terminated in the region then infested, and that the cotton free zone be maintained along the Rio Grande River bordering Mexico. Several other entomologists studied and suggested ways to control the boll weevil. Howard (1896) reported on the use of, and lack of response to, light traps. Malley (1901) studied the use of poisons for weevil control as well as the use of cotton as trap plants. An act was passed in 1903 offering $50,000 as a cash reward for a practical remedy for controlling the boll weevil. Sanderson (1904) reported that hand picking of infested squares had been tried and was meeting with little success.

Keywords

Cotton Plant Upland Cotton Ethanolamine Phosphatidyl Glyceryl Ether Boll Weevil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. A. Hedin
    • 1
  • A. C. Thompson
    • 1
  • R. C. Gueldner
    • 1
  1. 1.Boll Weevil Research Laboratory, Agricultural Research ServiceUSDAMississippiUSA

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