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Plant Apparency and Chemical Defense

  • Paul Feeny
Part of the Recent Advances in Phytochemistry book series (RBIO, volume 10)

Abstract

A major objective of insect ecology is to explain observed patterns of interaction between plants and herbivorous insects. We would like to understand both how such patterns are maintained in ecological time and also how they have come about in evolutionary time. A test of how far such understanding has progressed will be our ability to predict how patterns vary from one kind of community to another and how they will change when subjected to natural or human disturbance.

Keywords

Herbivorous Insect Chemical Defense Flea Beetle Glucosinolate Content Defensive Compound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Feeny
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Entomology & Section of Ecology & SystematicsCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

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