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Teratogenic effects of triamcinolone on the skeletal and lymphoid systems in nonhuman primates

  • A. G. Hendrickx
  • R. H. Sawyer
  • T. G. Terrell
  • B. I. Osburn
  • R. V. Henrickson
  • A. J. Steffek
Part of the FASEB Monographs book series (FASEBM, volume 6)

Abstract

Corticosteroids are used to treat several human diseases, especially allergies, and inflammatory, dermatologic and salt-imbalance conditions. Because of the possibility that treatment for one of these conditions might occur before a mother knows she is pregnant and that an effect may be exerted over a period of time which could encompass the organogenic or sensitive period, it is important to establish the teratogenic effect of these drugs. Walker (10, 11) has demonstrated that corticosteroids vary considerably in their teratogenic effects. Of the six corticosteroids tested he found triamcinolone to be one of the most teratogenic.

Keywords

Rhesus Monkey Cleft Palate Triamcinolone Acetonide Teratogenic Effect Choanal Atresia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. G. Hendrickx
    • 1
  • R. H. Sawyer
    • 1
  • T. G. Terrell
    • 1
  • B. I. Osburn
    • 1
  • R. V. Henrickson
    • 1
  • A. J. Steffek
    • 1
  1. 1.California Primate Research CenterUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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