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Human melanoma and leukemia associated antigens defined by nonhuman primate antisera

  • H. F. Seigler
  • R. S. Metzgar
  • T. Mohanakumar
  • G. M. Stuhlmiller
Part of the FASEB Monographs book series (FASEBM, volume 6)

Abstract

Tumor cells express many of the antigens of their original host. The experiments conducted with transplantable tumors of rodents by early workers (2, 16) have demonstrated the multiplicity of antigens present on the cell surface. It has been elucidated that tumor cells share not only normal tissue antigens but that they may gain new antigenic specificities with malignant transformation (6, 9, 12, 14). These tumor associated antigens have been demonstrated to be both cross-reactive and individual, utilizing a variety of immunological techniques (3, 7, 13, 15). The presence of fetal or oncofetal antigens on tumor cell membranes has stimulated recent interest as well (1, 4).

Keywords

Melanoma Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Tumor Associate Antigen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

ALL

acute lymphocytic leukemia

AML

acute myelogenous leukemia

CLL

chronic lymphocytic leukemia, CGL, chronic granulocytic leukemia

HRBC

human erythrocytes

AML

acute myelogenous leukemia

HWBC

human leukocytes

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Copyright information

© Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology 1975

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. F. Seigler
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. S. Metzgar
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • T. Mohanakumar
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • G. M. Stuhlmiller
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Yerkes Regional Primate CenterEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.Duke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  3. 3.Veterans Administration HospitalDurhamUSA

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