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Development of Form Perception in Repeated Brief Exposures to Visual Stimuli

  • John Uhlarik
  • Richard Johnson
Part of the Perception and Perceptual Development book series (PPD, volume 1)

Abstract

Many contemporary accounts of visual pattern perception hold that visual form is analyzed in terms of processes whereby specific features are extracted and compared to representations of previously experienced visual forms stored in memory. Two issues arising from this kind of information processing approach are (1) the nature of the features of the visual forms stored or encoded in memory and (2) the nature of the processes by which the stored information interacts with incoming information.

Keywords

Retinal Image Repeated Exposure Repetition Effect Perceptual Learning Visual Form 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Uhlarik
    • 1
  • Richard Johnson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyKansas State UniversityManhattanUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social SciencesAlexandriaUSA

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