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Effects of Selective Adaptation on the Perception of Speech and Visual Patterns: Evidence for Feature Detectors

  • Peter D. Eimas
  • Joanne L. Miller
Part of the Perception and Perceptual Development book series (PPD, volume 1)

Abstract

A trend in modern psychology is to assume that during perception complex stimulus events are first analyzed by neuronal structures or feature detectors into their component properties or features. The final percept is assumed to be a result of the recoding of these features according to the rules of operation of some higher, integrative level of processing. This type of perceptual model has had wide application in modern psychology, having been proffered in a variety of forms to explain such phenomena as the perception of visual patterns, including geometric shapes, letters, and words (e. g., Neisser, 1966), and the perception of the segmental units of speech (e. g., Abbs and Sussman, 1971).

Keywords

Spatial Frequency Test Stimulus Vision Research Speech Perception Human Visual System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter D. Eimas
    • 1
  • Joanne L. Miller
    • 2
  1. 1.Walter S. Hunter Laboratory of PsychologyBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyNortheastern UniversityBostonUSA

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