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Altered Early Environment: Effects on the Brain and Visual Behavior

  • Lawrence A. Rothblat
  • Michael L. Schwartz
Part of the Perception and Perceptual Development book series (PPD, volume 1)

Abstract

During postnatal ontogeny the brain is actively undergoing major morphological change, and much work has focused on the maturation of behavior contingent on this structural development. Although genetic factors seem to be primarily involved in the initial proliferation of axons and dendrites, there is now sufficient evidence to indicate that early sensory experience can influence neuronal organization. A generally accepted distinction has been made between macroneurons, whose structure and function are constrained genetically, and microneurons, which develop with little genetic control in terms of their connectivity (Altman and Das, 1967). It is the microneuron that is thought to be responsive to exogenous stimulation, providing the organism with the plasticity for experiential modification.

Keywords

Visual Cortex Receptive Field Retinal Ganglion Cell Superior Colliculus Lateral Geniculate Nucleus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lawrence A. Rothblat
    • 1
  • Michael L. Schwartz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyGeorge Washington UniversityUSA

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