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Affect Development and Cognition in a Piagetian Context

  • Thérèse Gouin Décarie
Part of the Genesis of Behavior book series (GOBE, volume 1)

Abstract

For more than half a century, Jean Piaget’s unique concern has been epistemology. As a young student of zoology, back in 1916, he dreamt of “constructing a biological epistemology based exclusively on the concept of development” (1950, Vol. 1, p. 5). In order to attain such an ambitious goal, Piaget was led to analyze the growth of intelligence, and in so doing, he began systematically to observe the schoolchild, the infant, the toddler, and eventually the adolescent. However, Piaget has always maintained that he is not a child psychologist, that his monumental work in child psychology has been only a “detour,” a “byproduct” (Piaget, 1970a).

Keywords

Child Development Virtual Object Object Concept Maternal Deprivation Object Permanence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thérèse Gouin Décarie
    • 1
  1. 1.Université de MontréalMontrealCanada

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