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A Clinician’s View of Affect Development in Infancy

  • Sally Provence
Part of the Genesis of Behavior book series (GOBE, volume 1)

Abstract

Freud’s first theory of neurosis was an affect theory. It developed into an instinct theory that, in the minds of many, superseded it. Jacobson, who pointed this out in a paper in 1954, believes that this occurrence greatly delayed efforts to clarify the concept of affects and their relationships to other aspects of development. Much that Freud formulated originally in terms of emotions has been shifted and rephrased into instinct theory, but pieces of affect theory have persisted as isolated fragments. Benjamin wrote in 1961, “we do not have [in psychoanalysis] an adequate theory of affects in general and of anxiety in particular, in spite of the significant contributions of Rapaport and others.”

Keywords

Psychoanalytic Theory Affect Development Affect Theory Psychoanalytic Study Reflex Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sally Provence
    • 1
  1. 1.Child Study CenterYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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