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In Vitro Binding and Autoradiographic Localization of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin and Follicle Stimulating Hormone in Rat Testes during Development

  • Claude Desjardins
  • Anthony J. Zeleznik
  • A. Rees MidgleyJr.
  • Leo E. ReichertJr.
Part of the Current Topics in Molecular Endocrinology book series (CTME, volume 1)

Abstract

The concept that certain target tissues contain specific recep­tors for peptide hormones has been widely recognized (1). In almost all instances the cellular attachment of peptide hormones to the cell surface has been correlated with the activation of mem­brane bound adenylate cyclase and the production of 3′, 5′ cyclic adenosine monophosphate, the presumed intracellular mediator of hormone action (1). A similar sequence of events has been postulated to occur after testicular interstitial tissue was exposed to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or lutenizing hormone (LH) (2, 3), or seminiferous epithelial cells were exposed to follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) (4). While these results support the notion that hCG/LH and FSH exert their effects on cells in the interstitial and tubular compartments of the testis, positive identification of the specific sites of high-affinity hCG/LH and FSH binding have not been defined at the tissue level in the same testis. Within this framework, it should be recognized that radioactive LH was localized selectively to Leydig cells (5–7) and that ferritin-labeled FSH appeared in the tubule wall and cytoplasm of Sertoli cells in rat testes (8). However, the latter findings may be ques­tioned in view of the possibility that metabolites of the labeled hor­mone were localized rather than the labeled hormone per se , since the hormone used was highly impure and massive amounts (i.e., 5 to 10 mg) were injected (8). Recent advances in the autoradio-graphic localization of peptide hormones in target tissues circum­vent the problems associated with hormone metabolites (9) and prompted us to reinvestigate the localization of gonadotrophic hor­mones in the testis.

Keywords

Follicle Stimulate Hormone Sertoli Cell Seminiferous Tubule Seminiferous Epithelium Testicular Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claude Desjardins
    • 1
  • Anthony J. Zeleznik
    • 2
  • A. Rees MidgleyJr.
    • 2
  • Leo E. ReichertJr.
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyThe University of TexasAustinUSA
  2. 2.Reproductive Endocrinology Program, Department of PathologyUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Department of Biochemistry, Division of Basic Health SciencesEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA

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