Advertisement

Application of Spectroscopy to Toxicology and Clinical Chemistry

  • Eleanor Berman
Part of the Modern Analytical Chemistry book series (MOAC)

Abstract

The modern science of spectroscopy marked its beginning before the eighteenth century. By 1700, L’Abbé Marie(1) had presented the first ideas about photometry. Then in 1732, Geoffrey, and later Melville and Marygraf(2) in 1752 and 1758, respectively, described colors imparted to flames by metallic salts. About 100 years later, an American physician, David Alter,(3) attempted to use the flame as a source for qualitative spectrochemical analysis. Subsequently, Bunsen and Kirchhoff(3) in Germany presented similar findings.

Keywords

Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Biological Material Clinical Chemistry Resonance Line Graphite Furnace 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    L’Abbe Marié, Nouvelle découverte sur 1a lumière pour en mesurer et compter les degrés, Paris (1700).Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    R. Herrmann and C. T. J. Alkemade, Chemical Analysis by Flame Photometry, Wiley-Interscience (1963).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    C. A. MacMunn, Spectrum Analysis Applied to Biology and Medicine, Longmans, Green & Company Ltd., London (1914).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    P. Champion, H. Pellet, and M. Grenier, Compt Rend. 76, 707 (1873).Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    A. Gouy, Compt. Rend. 83, 269 (1876).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    G. Valentin, Der Gebrauch des Spektroscopes zu physiologischen und ärztlichen Zwecken, Winter’sche Buchhandlung, Leipzig (1863).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    H. Bence-Jones, On Chemical Circulation in the Body, Proceedings of the Royal Institute, May 26, 1865.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    E. Rosenberg, The Use of the Spectroscope in Its Applications to Scientific and Practical Medicine, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York (1876).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    W. N. Hartley, Chem. News 5, 135 (1885).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    W. N. Hartley, Phil. Trans. Pt. II, 9 (1885).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    W. N. Hartley, Proc. Roy. Soc. 38, 1 (1885).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    W. N. Hartley, Proc. Roy. Soc. 38, 191 (1885).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    W. N. Hartley, J. Chem. Soc. 87, 1796 (1905).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    J. J. Dobbie and J. J. Fox, J. Chem. Soc. 103, 1193 (1913).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    J. J. Dobbie and J. J. Fox, J. Chem. Soc. 105, 1639 (1914).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    J. J. Dobbie and A. Lauder, J. Chem. Soc. 83, 605 (1903).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    J. J. Dobbie and A. Lauder, J. Chem. Soc. 97, 1546 (1910).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    J. J. Dobbie and A. Lauder, J. Chem. Soc. 99, 1254 (1911).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    W. W. Coblentz, Investigations of Infra Red Spectra, Carnegie Institution, Washington, D.C (1908).Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    R. G. White, Handbook of Ultraviolet Methods, Plenum Press, New York (1965).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    H. Schiller, Deut. Z. Ges. Gerichtl. Med. 29, 104 (1937-38).Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    L. R. Goldbaum, J. Pharm. Exp. Therap. 94, 68 (1948).Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    N. K. Freeman, Advan. Biol. Med. Phys. 4, 167 (1956).Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    R. A. Morton, Nature 193, 314 (1962).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    B. Klein, M. Weissman, and J. Berkowitz, Clin. Chem. 6, 453 (1960).Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    R. D. Stewart, T. R. Torkelson, C. L. Hake, and D. S. Erley, J. Lab. Clin. Med. 56, 148 (1960).Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    R. Alna and V. Tamminen, Ann. Med. Exp. Biol., Fenniae (Helsinki) 37, 157 (1959).Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    F. Rieders, J. Forensic Sci. 6, 401 (1961).Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    K. T. Fowler and P. Hugh-Jones, Brit. Med. J. 5029, 1205 (1957).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    K. Biemann, Ann. Rev. Biochem. 32, 755 (1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    D. M. Hercules, ed., Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Analysis: Principles and Applications, Wiley-Interscience (1966).Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    S. Undenfriend, Fluorescence Assay in Biology and Medicine, Vol. II, Academic Press, Inc., New York (1969).Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    S. Undenfriend, D. F. Duggan, B. M. Vasta, and B. B. Brodie, J. Pharm. Exp. Therap. 120, 26, (1957).Google Scholar
  34. 34.
    J. H. Sheldon and H. Ramage, Biochem. J. 25, 1608 (1931).Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    W. Gerlach and W. Gerlach, (Virchows) Arch. Pathol. Anat. Physiol. 28, 209 (1931).Google Scholar
  36. 36.
    W. Gerlach and W. Gerlach, Die Chemische Emissions-Spektralanalyse. II. Anwendung in Medizin, Chemie, und Mineralogie, Leopold Voss, Leipzig (1933).Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    W. Benoit, Z. Ges. Exp. Med. Biol. 90, S.421 (1933).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. 38.
    A. Policard, Protoplasma 19, 602 (1933).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    A. Policard and A. Morel, Bull. Histol. Appl. I, 9, 57 (1932).Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    W. Gerlach, W. Rollwaggen, and R. Intonti, (Virchows) Arch. Path. Anat. Physiol 301, 588 (1938).Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    G. H. Scott and P. S. Williams, Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 32, 505 (1934).Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    G. H. Scott and P. S. Williams, Anat. Record 64, 107 (1935).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    T. C. Boyd and N. K. De, Indian J. Med. Res. 20 (3), 789 (1933).Google Scholar
  44. 44.
    L. E. Gaul and A. H. Staud, Arch. Dermatol. Syph. 28, 790 (1933).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    L. E. Gaul and A. H. Staud, Arch. Dermatol. Syph. 30, 433 (1934).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. 46.
    L. E. Gaul and A. H. Staud, J. Amer. Med. Assoc. 104, 1387 (1935).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. 47.
    P. G. Shipley, F. T. M. Scott, and H. Blumberg, Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 51, 327 (1932).Google Scholar
  48. 48.
    J. Cholak, Ind. Eng. Chem. 7, 287 (1935a).Google Scholar
  49. 49.
    R. A. Kehoe, J. Nutri. 19, 579 (1940).Google Scholar
  50. 50.
    I. H. Tipton, in Metal-Binding in Medicine (M. J. Seven, ed.), J. B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia (1960), p. 27.Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    S. Natelson, M. R. Richelson, B. Shield, and S. L. Bender, Clin. Chem. 5, 579 (1959).Google Scholar
  52. 52.
    V. L. Grebe and F. Esser, Fortschr. Gebiete Roentgenstrahlen 54, 185 (1936).Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    S. Natelson, Gin. Chem. Suppl. 11, 290 (1965).Google Scholar
  54. 54.
    S. Natelson, M. R. Richelson, B. Shield, and S. L. Bender, Clin. Chem. 5, 579 (1959).Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    S. Natelson and B. Shield, Clin. Chem. 6, 299 (1960).Google Scholar
  56. 56.
    S. Natelson and B. Shield, Clin. Chem. 8, 17 (1962).Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    P. K. Lund and J. C. Mathies, Amer. J. Clin. Pathol. 4, 132 (1963).Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    P. K. Lund, D. A. Morningstar, and J. C. Mathies, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 14, 177 (1964).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  59. 59.
    P. K. Lund and J. C. Mathies, Amer. J. Clin. Pathol. 44, 398 (1965).Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    E. J. Brooks, O. R. Gates, and M. Nottingham, Amer. J. Clin. Pathol. 41, 154 (1964).Google Scholar
  61. 61.
    A. Zettner, L. C. Sylvia, and L. Capacho-Delgado, Amer. J. Clin. Pathol. 45, 533 (1966).Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    I. W. F. Davidson and W. L. Secrest, Anal. Chem. 44, 1808 (1972).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. 63.
    R. A. Kehoe, J. Cholak, and R. V. Story, J. Nutr. 19, 579 (1940).Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    H. T. Delves, Analyst 95, 431 (1970).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. 65.
    R. J. Henry, Clinical Chemistry: Principles and Techniques, Harper & Row, Publishers, New York (1969).Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    J. A. Halsted, B. Hackley, and J. C. Smith, Lancet 2, 278 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. 67.
    H. Wolff, Biochem. Z. 319, 1 (1948).Google Scholar
  68. 68.
    A. Heyrovsky, Casopis Lekaru Ceskych 91, 680 (1952).Google Scholar
  69. 69.
    F. J. Feldman, E. C. Knoblock, and W. C. Purdy, Anal. Chim. Acta 38, 489 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. 70.
    G. C. Cotzias, S. T. Miller, and J. Edwards, J. Lab. Clin. Med. 67, 836 (1966).Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    P. S. Papavasilion, S. T. Miller, and G. C. Cotzias, Amer. J. Physiol. 211, 211 (1966).Google Scholar
  72. 72.
    F. W. Sunderman, Amer. J. Clin. Pathol. 44, 182 (1965).Google Scholar
  73. 73.
    S. Nomoto and F. W. Sunderman, Jr., Gin. Chem. 16, 477 (1970).Google Scholar
  74. 74.
    K. Liebscher and H. Smith, Arch. Environ. Health 17, 881 (1968).Google Scholar
  75. 75.
    H. M. Perry, Jr., I. H. Tipton, H. A. Schroeder, and M. J. Cook, J. Lab. Clin. Med. 60, 245 (1962).Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    I. H. Tipton and M. J. Cook, Health Phys. 9, 103 (1963).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. 77.
    R. Robertson, K. Fritze, and P. Grof, Clin. Chim. Acta 45, 25 (1973).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. 78.
    D. Brune, K. Samsahl, and P. O. Wester, Clin. Chim. Acta 13, 285 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. 79.
    J. Lieben and F. Metzner, Amer. Ind. Hyg. Assoc. Abstr., Ind. Health Conference, 1959.Google Scholar
  80. 80.
    H. A. Schroeder, in Metal-Binding in Medicine (M. J. Seven, ed.), J. B. Lippincott, Philadelphia (1960).Google Scholar
  81. 81.
    H. R. Imbrus, J. Cholak, I. H. Miller, and T. Sterling, Arch. Environ. Health 6, 286, (1963).Google Scholar
  82. 82.
    J. Kubata, A. Lazar, and F. L. Loses, Arch. Environ. Health 16, 788 (1968).Google Scholar
  83. 83.
    R. A. Kehoe, J. Cholak, and R. V. Story, J. Nutr. 19, 579 (1940).Google Scholar
  84. 84.
    C. C. Patterson, Arch. Environ. Health 11, 344 (1965).Google Scholar
  85. 85.
    L. J. Goldwater, Mercury: A History of Quicksilver, York Press, Baltimore (1972).Google Scholar
  86. 86.
    E. M. Richeson, Ind. Med. 27, 607 (1958).Google Scholar
  87. 87.
    R. Mavrodineanu, ed., Analytical Flame Spectroscopy, Springer-Verlag, New York (1970).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eleanor Berman
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of BiochemistryCook County HospitalChicagoUSA

Personalised recommendations