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Lethal and Mutagenic Effects of Near-Ultraviolet Radiation

  • Robert B. Webb

Abstract

Ultraviolet (UV) radiation* of wavelengths longer than 295 nm from sunlight is a ubiquitous part of the natural environment of most organisms. Although beneficial and possibly beneficial aspects of sunlight have long been recognized and studied (Daniels, 1974; Wurtman, 1975), harmful effects, except for sunburn, have received relatively little attention until recently. Photochemical possibilities of natural components of the cell suggest that efficient mechanisms for the partial prevention or repair of resultant damage from exposure to solar radiation must exist for biological entities to survive regular exposure to natural sunlight. Recent work has identified DNA lesions induced by near-UV radiation (Section 2.4). Furthermore, mechanisms of protection and repair of near-UV-induced lesions have been reported (Sections 2.3 and 2.6).

Keywords

Action Spectrum Fluence Rate Pyrimidine Dimer Oxygen Dependence recA Strain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert B. Webb
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Biological and Medical ResearchArgonne National LaboratoryArgonneUSA

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