Acquired Control of Peripheral Vascular Responses

  • Wesley C. Lynch
  • Uwe Schuri

Abstract

The present chapter addresses the question of whether or not experience can lead to a modification of peripheral vascular function. Under normal circumstances, the vascular system of most mammals is regulated by automatic mechanisms. At issue here is whether individuals can learn to modify this automatic regulation.

Keywords

Placebo Dioxide Convection Heat Content Respiration 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wesley C. Lynch
    • 1
  • Uwe Schuri
    • 1
  1. 1.Rockefeller UniversityNew YorkUSA

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