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Stimulus-Bound Behavior and Biological Self-Regulation: Feeding, Obesity, and External Control

  • Judith Rodin

Abstract

One challenge of contributing to this series is that it provides the incentive to try to reconceptualize work on the eating behavior of humans in terms of consciousness and self-regulation. In animals, eating is one behavioral component of long-term weight regulation and energy balance and, as such, is part of an exquisitely precise biological feedback system. However, in humans, eating often occurs for reasons other than the regulation and maintenance of body weight, and thus the biologically determined system can be overcome or at least disturbed. For example, people often overeat when food is plentiful; they take dessert when there is no longer a physiologic need; they eat at certain times of the day whether or not there is actual depletion. If biological regulation is disturbed by the impact of these external stimuli upon feeding, how do people actually regulate their body weight? The answer is that many do not, and some become overweight.

Keywords

Eating Behavior External Stimulus Visual Salience Overweight Individual Overweight Subject 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judith Rodin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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