Hypnotic Susceptibility, EEG-Alpha, and Self-Regulation

  • David R. Engstrom

Abstract

Hypnosis is probably more popularly known, revered, feared, and mystified than any other informational control known to man. Its methods, motives, and outcomes have been bent out of shape by hundreds of old movies and old wives’ tales. The mass media have formed popular knowledge of hypnosis largely from improbable clinical applications and naïvely effective coercive control by bad guys.

Keywords

Covariance Immobilization Assure Beach Hull 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • David R. Engstrom
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry & Human Behavior and Student Health ServiceUniversity of CaliforniaIrvineUSA

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