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A Model of Consciousness

  • E. Roy John

Abstract

In the first textbook of physiological psychology, written by Wilhelm Wundt (1910) at the end of the 19th century, Wundt defined the task of physiological psychology as the analysis of the physiological bases of consciousness and subjective experience. In the textbook of physiological psychology which I used when a student, written by Morgan and Stellar (1950) in the middle of the 20th century, physiological psychology was defined as the study of the physiological bases of behavior. The word consciousness does not even appear in the index of the latter volume, nor have I encountered it anywhere in the text.

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Test Stimulus Subjective Experience Reticular Formation Firing Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Roy John
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryNew York Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhysiologyNew York Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA

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