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Improving Comprehension for Jury Instructions

  • Bruce Dennis Sales
  • Amiram Elwork
  • James J. Alfini
Part of the Perspectives in Law & Psychology book series (PILP, volume 1)

Abstract

“What happens if a jury misunderstands the judge’s instructions and finds a defendant guilty when it really meant to free him? Last week in Washington, D.C., Judge Joseph M. Hannon was confronted with this question— and had precious few precedents to draw on.

Keywords

Word Frequency Verbal Learn Verbal Behavior Concrete Word Subordinate Clause 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce Dennis Sales
    • 1
  • Amiram Elwork
    • 1
  • James J. Alfini
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Nebraska-LincolnLincolnUSA
  2. 2.American Judicature SocietyChicagoUSA

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