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Behavioral Ecology, Health Status, and Health Care: Applications to the Rehabilitation Setting

  • Edwin P. Willems

Abstract

This paper is about a view of behavior-environment relations called behavioral ecology, about health status and health care for persons hospitalized with spinal cord injuries, and about some relationships between these two areas. One major purpose is to communicate some of the essential flavor of behavioral ecology. This will be done by presenting some background comments in the next section and presenting some key aspects or guiding assumptions of behavioral ecology in a later section.

Keywords

Spinal Cord Injury Human Behavior Behavior Setting Behavioral Ecology Patient Performance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edwin P. Willems
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HoustonHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Texas Institute for Rehabilitation and ResearchHoustonUSA

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