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Memory from a Cognitive-Developmental Perspective

A Theoretical and Empirical Review
  • Lynn S. Liben

Overview

Jean Piaget’s early work was largely concerned with the identification and explanation of qualitative changes in the developing child’s intellectual structure. Subsequent Genevan work has been concerned with clarifying the ways in which this general intellectual structure interacts with other cognitive processes such as perception (Piaget, 1969) and imagery (Piaget and Inhelder, 1971). More recently, Piaget and Inhelder (1973) have examined the relation between intelligence and memory, and it is this work that is reviewed in the present chapter.

Keywords

Memory Task Operative Level Retention Interval Kindergarten Child Intellectual Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynn S. Liben
    • 1
  1. 1.The Pennsylvania State UniversityUniversity ParkUSA

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