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Killing of Nucleated Cells by Antibody and Complement

  • Sarkis H. Ohanian
  • Tibor Borsos
Part of the Comprehensive Immunology book series (COMIMUN, volume 2)

Abstract

The ability of antibody-antigen complexes to fix complement (C) has been known since the end of the last century. Up to and including the recent past, complement has been used mainly as a very sensitive indicator to detect the interaction of antibody with antigen. With the development of refined immunochemical methods it has been possible to analyze what complement is and to study its interaction with antigen-antibody complexes and with the surface of the cell (Müller-Eberhard, 1968; Rapp and Borsos, 1970; Humphrey and Dourmashkin, 1965, 1969).

Keywords

Nucleate Cell Sheep Erythrocyte Antigen Density Forssman Antibody Immune Gamma Globulin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sarkis H. Ohanian
    • 1
  • Tibor Borsos
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Immunobiology, National Cancer InstituteNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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