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Cognition and Instruction: Toward a Cognitive Theory of Learning

  • James F. Voss
Part of the Nato Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 5)

Abstract

Contemporary cognitive psychology has focused upon problems of perception and memory, an emphasis that has led to an apparent decrease of research in the area of learning.1 A reasonable question to ask, therefore, is whether the cognitive movement has neglected the study of learning, or whether cognitive psychology has incorporated the concept of learning, but has done so under a different terminology.

Keywords

Work Memory Capacity Memory Structure Context Sentence High Knowledge Target Sentence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • James F. Voss
    • 1
  1. 1.University of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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