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On the Re-Integration of Linguistics and Psychology

  • Bruce L. Derwing
  • William J. Baker
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 4b)

Keywords

Noun Phrase Syntactic Structure Language Product Generative Grammar Communicative Situation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce L. Derwing
    • 1
  • William J. Baker
    • 1
  1. 1.University of AlbertaCanada

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