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Learned Control of Brain Wave Activity

  • Laverne C. Johnson
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 2)

Abstract

I understand the purpose of my presentation is to present a tutorial and to set the stage for those presenting research papers this afternoon. My function thus is to review the work of others rather than present our own research, but I will not be able to strictly adhere to this guideline as I will present some of the work from our Naval Health Research Center laboratory.

Keywords

Seizure Frequency Operant Conditioning Learn Control Theta Activity Alpha Rhythm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Laverne C. Johnson
    • 1
  1. 1.Naval Health Research CenterSan DiegoUSA

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