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Mechanisms of Learned Voluntary Control of Blood Pressure in Patients with Generalised Bodily Paralysis

  • T. G. Pickering
  • B. Brucker
  • H. L. Frankel
  • C. J. Mathias
  • B. R. Dworkin
  • N. E. Miller
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 2)

Abstract

Although there have been several reports of learned voluntary control of blood pressure in man (reviewed by Blanchard and Young, 1972), there is little information concerning the mechanism of such changes. In the experiments reported here, we have been particularly concerned to eliminate mediation of blood pressure changes occurring secondarily to alterations of breathing or muscle tension by working with paralysed patients in whom voluntary control of skeletal muscles was minimal, so that any learned blood pressure changes are likely to be produced by direct autonomic control.

Keywords

Muscular Dystrophy Systolic Pressure Diastolic Pressure Voluntary Control Blood Pressure Change 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. G. Pickering
    • 1
  • B. Brucker
    • 2
  • H. L. Frankel
    • 3
  • C. J. Mathias
    • 3
  • B. R. Dworkin
    • 4
  • N. E. Miller
    • 4
  1. 1.Radcliffe InfirmaryOxfordUK
  2. 2.Goldwater Memorial HospitalNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Spinal Injuries CentreStoke Mandeville HospitalEngland
  4. 4.Rockefeller UniversityUSA

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