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Operant Enhancement of EEG-Theta Activity

  • N. Birbaumer
Part of the NATO Conference Series book series (NATOCS, volume 2)

Abstract

During the last several years the interest in “operant” control of theta activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG) has rapidly increased. Apart from concern for actual scientific support, a wide range of clinical methods for “theta-control” are advertised by the biofeedback industry. This interest was partly stimulated by speculations on the involvement of theta activity in specific psychological and behavioral responses.

Keywords

Sleep Stage Operant Enhancement Theta Activity Target Line Theta Rhythm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Birbaumer
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of PsychologyUniversity of TübingenGermany

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