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Clearance of Myelin Basic Protein from Blood of Normal and EAE Rabbits

  • L. F. Eng
  • Y-L. Lee
  • K. Williams
  • G. Fukayama
  • B. Gerstl
  • M. Kies
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 100)

Summary

The rate of clearance of porcine myelin basic protein (MBP) from plasma of rabbits was determined following intravenous injection of 20 mg MBP. The MBP level in the plasma was measured by a 2-site immunoradiometric assay with specific antibody to guinea pig MBP produced in rabbits. Plasma MBP-antibody levels were determined by competitive binding radioimmune assay (RIA). Unsensitized and those sensitized with complete Freund–s adjuvant (CFA), with porcine MBP in CFA, and with whole porcine spinal cord in CFA were studied. Unsensitized and CFA sensitized rabbits exhibited maximum MBP levels in the plasma within two minutes after injection with rapid decrease to undetectable levels in one hour. Thirty-nine of the unsensitized (control) rabbits exhibited normal, rapid clearance and no subsequent physical signs of EAE while one of the control rabbits exhibited a slightly retarded clearance rate. Histologic examination of autopsy tissues from the control group revealed that five rabbits showed lesions which could be attributed to Encephalitozoan cuniculi or Toxoplasma and one rabbit autopsied 65 days after clearance had minimal EAR lesions. Rabbits sensitized with MBP exhibited a retarded rate of clearance at the acute stage of EAE and following recovery. Rabbits sensitized with whole spinal cord in CFA also exhibited a retarded rate of MBP clearance. Anti (MBP) antibodies were detected in the plasma of all rabbits which exhibited a retarded rate of MBP clearance. Significant rates of retardation were not detected until approximately three weeks after sensitization with CFA-MBP or CFA-spinal cord. While MBP antibody levels in most animals were not detected by the immunodiffusion technique, antibodies were demonstrated by RIA. The 20 mg MBP given intravenously is probably in great antigen excess and conducive to the formation of soluble MBP-anti(MBP) complexes in the blood.

Keywords

Myelin Basic Protein Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis Clearance Study Autopsy Tissue Percent Binding 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. F. Eng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y-L. Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Williams
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Fukayama
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. Gerstl
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Kies
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PathologyStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Administration HospitalPalo AltoUSA
  3. 3.Section on Myelin Chemistry, Laboratory of Cerebral MetabolismNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA

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