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The On-Off Effect in Parkinson’s Disease Treated with Levodopa with Remarks Concerning the Effect of Sleep

  • Edward C. Clark
  • Bertram Feinstein
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB)

Abstract

The “On-Off Effect” in levodopa treated Parkinson’s disease began in a few patients during the first year of treatment. The number of patients suffering from this phenomenon increased rapidly the first three or four years with some continuing increase through out the six years of the study. Even those whose disease had worsened would become even more incapacitated during parts of each day. One group of patients experienced their initial “On” effect upon arising at their usual hour of awakening. This would last for 1 to 3 hours and was their best time of day.

One group of patients experienced their initial “On” effect upon arising at their usual hour of awakening. This would last for 1 to 3 hours and was their best time of day.

Keywords

Divided Dose Involuntary Movement Dopa Blood Standard Levodopa Acknowledgement Gratitude 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward C. Clark
    • 1
  • Bertram Feinstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosciencesMount Zion Hospital and Medical CenterSan FranciscoUSA

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