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New Approaches in the Management of Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders

  • Stanley Fahn
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB)

Abstract

This review covers recent advances in a variety of dyskinesias. Introduction of new drugs for the treatment of myoclonus and sensory biofeedback therapy for focal dystonia are expanding our concepts of these types of movement disorders. Progress in the treatment of action myoclonus is especially noteworthy and has led to the impli cation of serotonin deficit in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Knowledge of the biochemical pathology of Huntington’s chorea has outpaced therapy for this disorder, but new forms of therapy have been proposed based on the chemical findings. Basic pharmacologic studies suggest pathophysiologic mechanisms for the syndrome known as tardive dyskinesia, but treatment is still far from ideal for this disorder. Other movement disorders with recent therapeutic advances include essential tremor and hemiballism

This review will cover only those dyskinesias in which new therapies have been advanced in the last few years. Aside from parkinsonism, which will not be discussed here, progress in the treatment of movement disorders has been slow, but steady. New drugs are being tested constantly, and the purpose of this review is to call attention to the ongoing evaluations in this field. Descriptions and etiologies for these dyskinesias are covered elsewhere (Fahn, 1976a) and therefore are not repeated here.

Keywords

Movement Disorder Essential Tremor Tardive Dyskinesia Focal Dystonia Generalize Dystonia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stanley Fahn
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons and Neurological Institute of New YorkColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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