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Disorders of Lipid and Lipoprotein Metabolism

  • DeWitt S. Goodman

Abstract

It is the aim of this chapter to review the major advances that occurred during 1976 with regard to our knowledge about the metabolism of the major plasma lipids and lipoproteins and about clinical abnormalities in lipid transport, with particular emphasis on the hyperlipidemias. The chapter will build on, and in part briefly summarize, the information and ideas reviewed last year (Goodman, 1976), and will also review briefly some other major developments that occurred before 1976 in order to provide important background information.

Keywords

Obesity Dementia Heparin Pancreatitis Folate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • DeWitt S. Goodman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and SurgeonsColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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