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Thematic Apperception Test and Related Methods

  • Morris I. Stein

Abstract

The Thematic Apperception Test (TAT) was introduced to the psychological world in 1935 by Morgan and Murray. Its conception and birth, as with those of mythological heroes, were cloaked in mystery (Holt, 1949). Conditions surrounding its infancy are clearer, because it was reared at the Harvard Psychological Clinic, in the little yellow house on Plympton Street, with press congenial environment and press nurturance. Doting parents and dedicated disciples clearly saw the newborn infant’s power to cast light on the darkest recesses of personality dynamics.

Keywords

Personality Assessment Projective Technique Fairy Tale Overt Behavior Group Administration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Morris I. Stein
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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